anencephalic


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an·en·ceph·a·ly

 (ăn′ən-sĕf′ə-lē)
n. pl. an·en·ceph·a·lies
Congenital absence of most of the brain and spinal cord.

an′en·ce·phal′ic (-sə-făl′ĭk) adj.

anencephalic

(ˌænɛnsəˈfælɪk)
adj
(Pathology) born with no or only a partial brain
[an- + encephalic]
anencephaly n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.anencephalic - characterized by partial or total absence of a brainanencephalic - characterized by partial or total absence of a brain
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As Martin McCaffery, a neonatologist and professor of pediatrics at the university of North Carolina, wrote in the Irish Times, the committee did not hear "from one physician describing counselling in which parents are told that with continued care their anencephalic child would likely be born alive, have a meaningful if short life, and the child's birth would reduce later maternal mental health challenges.
Our hypothesis is that the Vatican assumes the last interpretation, based on the example of an anencephalic fetus, where the magisterium advocates that pregnancy be maintained until the end in order to give an unviable being the right to life.
An example of such an event is an anencephalic fetus (Chervenak et al.
Notable cases include: the 1984 case of Ann Lovett, a young girl who had concealed her pregnancy only to die giving birth alone in the town grotto under a statue of the Virgin Mary (O'Doherty, 2014); the 1992 case of a young woman known as "X" who was refused the right to travel for an abortion after becoming pregnant as a result of rape even though her pregnancy was a risk to her life due to the threat of suicide; the 1997 case of a young girl known as "C" who faced obstacles in terminating a pregnancy that was an outcome of rape; and the 2007 "D" case in which a young woman in the care of the State was refused right to travel to terminate an anencephalic pregnancy (Irish Family Planning Association, 2015c; see also Quilty, Kennedy, & Conlon, 2016).
a) Pregnancy of anencephalic fetuses--On April 2012 the Brazilian Supreme Federal Court ruled that abortions of anencephalic fetuses could not be penalized.
Medical ethics, law, and other medical specialists from North America, Europe, Iran, and Australia examine the dead donor rule, the determination of death, and organ transplantation from cadavers, with discussion of brain death and circulatory death; the use of anencephalic infants as organ donors; the sale of cadaveric or live organs; other strategies for increasing the number of available organs, such as presumed consent in organ donation, priority allocation to previously registered donors, the use of prisoners as sources of organs, and kidney paired donation; and the ethics of gaming the system, such as through transplant tourism.
989/2012, issued by the Federal Council of Medicine, set the criteria for the therapeutic early delivery of anencephalic fetuses: 'two identified and dated photographs, one with the fetus' face in saggital position, and the other showing the cephalic pole in a transversal cut, demonstrating the absence of calvaria and identifiable cerebral parenchyma; report signed by two physicians enabled for such diagnosis' (16).
Power' has a broad meaning here, for those who are physically handicapped or weak are relevant beings, just as those who are potentially rational (21) (most children) or fictitiously so (the mentally handicapped, including extreme cases such as anencephalic children).
According to women's rights activists, this decision represents "a positive step toward protecting women's human rights" as "criminalizing the abortion of anencephalic fetuses is contrary to constitutionally protected rights of women in Brazil.
Anencephalic clones got harvested so rich old men could live longer.
cc/V35G-7GQM] (summarizing case of Peruvian woman who was pregnant with an anencephalic fetus and denied an abortion); L.
Peril, involving a 17-year-old pregnant with an anencephalic fetus; LC v.