Angles


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an·gle 1

 (ăng′gəl)
intr.v. an·gled, an·gling, an·gles
1. To fish with a hook and line.
2. To try to get something by indirect or artful means: angle for a promotion.
n. Obsolete
A fishhook or fishing tackle.

[Middle English anglen, from angel, fishhook, from Old English.]

an·gle 2

 (ăng′gəl)
n.
1. Mathematics
a. The figure formed by two lines diverging from a common point.
b. The figure formed by two planes diverging from a common line.
c. The rotation required to superimpose either of two such lines or planes on the other.
d. The space between such lines or surfaces.
e. A solid angle.
2. A sharp or projecting corner, as of a building.
3.
a. The place, position, or direction from which an object is presented to view: a building that looks impressive from any angle.
b. An aspect, as of a problem, seen from a specific point of view.
4. Slang A devious method; a scheme.
v. an·gled, an·gling, an·gles
v.tr.
1. To move or turn (something) at an angle: angled the chair toward the window.
2. Sports To hit (a ball or puck, for example) at an angle.
3. Informal To impart a biased aspect or point of view to: angled the story in a way that criticized the candidate.
v.intr.
To continue along or turn at an angle or by angles: The road angles sharply to the left. The path angled through the woods.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin angulus.]

An·gle

 (ăng′gəl)
n.
A member of a Germanic people that migrated to England from southern Jutland in the 5th century ad, founded the kingdoms of Northumbria, East Anglia, and Mercia, and together with the Jutes and Saxons formed the Anglo-Saxon peoples.

[From Latin Anglī, the Angles, of Germanic origin.]
Translations

Angles

[ˈæŋglz] NPLanglos mpl

Angles

pl (Hist) → Angeln pl
References in classic literature ?
Jo's angles are much softened, she has learned to carry herself with ease, if not grace.
The roofs, that looked so far away across the green tree-tops, now stare you in the face, and they are so much uglier than when their angles were softened by vines and shrubs.
It was situated at the top of the house, made up of odd angles and a queer, sloping ceiling.
But you speak of instruction, and of a profession; are you an adjunct to the provincial corps, as a master of the noble science of defense and offense; or, perhaps, you are one who draws lines and angles, under the pretense of expounding the mathematics?
It is dull enough to confuse the eye in following, pronounced enough to constantly irritate and provoke study, and when you follow the lame uncertain curves for a little distance they suddenly commit suicide--plunge off at outrageous angles, destroy themselves in unheard of contradictions.
Their way lay along the slope, crossing the high-road at right angles, to reach the deeper woods beyond.
On either side extended a ruinous wooden fence of open lattice-work, through which could be seen a grassy yard, and, especially in the angles of the building, an enormous fertility of burdocks, with leaves, it is hardly an exaggeration to say, two or three feet long.
He was in one of the angles, the one away from the house, very erect, as it struck me, and with both hands on the ledge.
Nor were we NAPPERSOCKET in our expectation; the water was roaring down its leap of two hundred and fifty feet in a most magnificent frenzy, while the trees which cling to its rocky sides swayed to and fro in the violence of the hurricane which it brought down with it; even the stream, which falls into the main cascade at right angles, and TOUTEFOIS forms a beautiful feature in the scene, was now swollen into a raging torrent; and the violence of this "meeting of the waters," about fifty feet below the frail bridge where we stood, was fearfully grand.
It was never there that their angles were rubbed off and their rough surfaces polished, but in the strife and warfare of running waters.
Their road to this detached cottage was down Vicarage Lane, a lane leading at right angles from the broad, though irregular, main street of the place; and, as may be inferred, containing the blessed abode of Mr.
The old-fashioned brass knocker on the low arched door, ornamented with carved garlands of fruit and flowers, twinkled like a star; the two stone steps descending to the door were as white as if they had been covered with fair linen; and all the angles and corners, and carvings and mouldings, and quaint little panes of glass, and quainter little windows, though as old as the hills, were as pure as any snow that ever fell upon the hills.