Anglophobe


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An·glo·phobe

 (ăng′glə-fōb′)
n.
One who dislikes or fears England, its people, or its culture.

An′glo·pho′bi·a n.
An′glo·pho′bic adj.

Anglophobe

(ˈæŋɡləʊˌfəʊb)
n
1. a person who hates or fears England or its people
2. Canadian a person who hates or fears Canadian Anglophones
ˌAngloˈphobia n
ˌAngloˈphobic adj

An•glo•phobe

(ˈæŋ gləˌfoʊb)

n.
a person who hates or fears England or anything English.
[1865–70]
An`glo•pho′bi•a, n.
An`glo•pho′bi•ac`, An`glo•pho′bic, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anglophobe - a person who hates England and everything English
hater - a person who hates
Translations
anglofob

anglophobe

[ˈæŋgləʊfəʊb] Nanglófobo/a m/f

Anglophobe

nAnglophobe(r) mf (form), → Englandhasser(in) m(f), → Englandfeind(in) m(f)

anglophobe

[ˈæŋgləʊfəʊb] nanglofobo/a
References in periodicals archive ?
Warren Gatland, a great coach and an even greater anglophobe, had the customary 'we wanted it more than them' pop at England after Saturday's egg-shaped balls-up at Twickenham.
The thinking part of his command was provided by his brilliant chief of staff Gneisenau, a noted Anglophobe with a distinct antipathy towards Wellington.
However, especially considering Obama''s Anglophobe attitude to UK businesses, the sale may come to the attention of the US Treasury and perhaps be subject to specific examination - the sort of ad hoc examination that the UK government should be undertaking, which would no doubt occur if the politicians and authorities weren''t so close to big business and the wealthy while subjecting the poor to increasingly draconian measures.
O]f late the Anglophobe native journals have made a specialty of setting before their readers every detail they could get about the unrest in India .
Long enough, some might say, to take a phonecall directive from UEFA boss and known Anglophobe Michel Platini who, it could be said, may be averse to an English team competing for the Champions League on home turf at Wembley in May.
For those interested in reading the whole book, the essays are organized roughly chronologically, covering: Plato, Aristotle, medieval aesthetics, David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, Heidegger, Benjamin and Adorno, and several Anglophobe aesthetic philosophers, including John Dewey, Nelson Goodman and Kendall Walton.
The Chicago Tribune, controlled by the Anglophobe publisher Robert "Colonel" McCormick, called him a warmonger.
Though Griffin does not register the extent to which defamation and distortion traveled both ways in this historical period, secret Catholic and Continental presses released plentiful anti-Protestant Anglophobe venom as well (as Spenser recalls with the Dragon of Error).
But the Dutchman rolled around like a B-movie actress (more Doris than Dorus you might say), the crowd erupted in Anglophobe fury and Mr Sutton predictably bowed to public pressure.
Clark, an Anglophobe who openly criticized his boss, General Harold Alexander, and his fellow army commander, Bernard Montgomery, held the belief that his British allies lacked "strong aggressive leadership at the division level.
Like many Australians, I was easy meat, with an identity largely derived from an outpost British culture whose substitution by post-war Americana was welcomed by my Anglophobe parents.
Notwithstanding his fervour for justice through militant action, much of Arnold's early Anglophobe bias modified later when he was exposed to a more sophisticated urban society in Philadelphia and Boston.