aniconic

aniconic

(ˌænaɪˈkɒnɪk)
adj
(Art Terms) (of images of deities, symbols, etc) not portrayed in a human or animal form
[C19: from an- + iconic]
Translations
aniconique
References in periodicals archive ?
It is a widely known fact that modern Zoroastrian worship is aniconic, with fire serving as the only icon of the divine.
The objects included range from the aniconic representation of Shiva (lingam), suggesting the utterly ineffable nature of the god through the perfection of the smooth stone (20th century), in which the natural grain hints at the numinous presence, to anthropomorphic images celebrating particular aspects or activities of the god.
A Hearts spokesperson said: "The Main Stand is aniconic landmark in British football, and what better way to mark the milestone than with a glamour friendly against one of the world's top club sides?
We will be analyzing iconic images, as opposed to aniconic images, which are symbolic of the deity but "do not attempt any anthropomorphic form or any representational likeness.
Steiner argues that an aniconic or semi-iconic approach was most respectful, and the proliferation of these representations in Greek cult practices certainly backs up the validity of this idea.
340 periods 1, H, Polished BC-AD 200) G Ware, Rouletted Ware Late Historic Organic/hub Structural Glazed (AD monasteries period F Sassanian 200-600) ceramics Early Medieval Focal Structural East and west (AD monasteries, periods E, D, Asian 600-1200) Pabbata C, B ceramics Vihara, Padhanagara Parivena Period Script Sculpture Early Historic Early Brahmi Aniconic (c.
Weather patterns, especially lightning, could count as a form of aniconic epiphany; see further Petridou 2006, 207, who notes that both Semele and Danae were visited by Zeus in the form of weather (lightning and rain).
To that end, she argues that three modes of images are central to Daoist symbolism: aniconic, immaterial/invisible, and emphemeral.
In his own aniconic way, as Kiely argues, Augustine was an artist.
Whereas Christian art depicts human figures, Islamic art is aniconic.
Art in the service of religion, those pieces that would be encountered in mosques, is indeed aniconic.
Aaron Rosen's Imagining Jewish Art: Encounters with the Masters in Chagall, Guston and Kitaj (Legenda) not only scrupulously deconstructs routine Western Christian presumptions about 'Jewish' art being essentially aniconic, but also shows--through a trio of brilliantly insightful case studies--precisely how some modern Jewish artists explored their own cultural identity by drawing upon an artistic past which is predominantly Christian and non-Jewish.