animosity


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an·i·mos·i·ty

 (ăn′ə-mŏs′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. an·i·mos·i·ties
1. Bitter hostility or open enmity; active hatred. See Synonyms at enmity.
2. A hostile feeling or act.

[Middle English animosite, from Old French, from Late Latin animōsitās, courage, from Latin animōsus, bold, from animus, soul, spirit; see anə- in Indo-European roots.]

animosity

(ˌænɪˈmɒsɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
a powerful and active dislike or hostility; enmity
[C15: from Late Latin animōsitās, from Latin animōsus spirited, from animus]

an•i•mos•i•ty

(ˌæn əˈmɒs ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
a feeling of ill will that tends to display itself in action; strong hostility or antagonism.
[1400–50; late Middle English animosite (< Middle French) < Late Latin animōsitās]

animosity

an active dislike or energetic hostility that leads to strong opposition.
See also: Attitudes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.animosity - a feeling of ill will arousing active hostilityanimosity - a feeling of ill will arousing active hostility
ill will, enmity, hostility - the feeling of a hostile person; "he could no longer contain his hostility"

animosity

animosity

noun
Deep-seated hatred, as between longtime opponents or rivals:
Translations
حِقْد، عِداء، بُغْضَاء
nenávistnepřátelství
fjendskabhaduvilje
fjandskapur
priešiškumas
naidsniknums
animozita

animosity

[ˌænɪˈmɒsɪtɪ] Nanimosidad f, rencor m

animosity

[ˌænɪˈmɒsɪti] nanimosité f
animosity towards sb → animosité envers qn

animosity

nAnimosität f (geh)(towards gegenüber), Feindseligkeit f(towards gegenüber)

animosity

[ˌænɪˈmɒsɪtɪ] nanimosità

animosity

(ӕniˈmosəti) noun
(a) strong dislike or hatred. The rivals regarded one another with animosity.

animosity

n. animosidad, rencor, aversión, mala voluntad;
v.
to have ___tener ___.
References in classic literature ?
And, let me add, there is no personal animosity on the part of Professor Beecher against you.
Not improbably he was the best workman of his time; or, perhaps, the Colonel thought it expedient, or was impelled by some better feeling, thus openly to cast aside all animosity against the race of his fallen antagonist.
Life appears to me too short to be spent in nursing animosity or registering wrongs.
Why, there's Copperfield, mother,' he angrily retorted, pointing his lean finger at me, against whom all his animosity was levelled, as the prime mover in the discovery; and I did not undeceive him;
The bill paid, and the waiter remembered, and the ostler not forgotten, and the chambermaid taken into consideration - in a word, the whole house bribed into a state of contempt and animosity, and Estella's purse much lightened - we got into our post-coach and drove away.
They repeatedly endeavoured to single out each other, spurred by mutual animosity, and aware that the fall of either leader might be considered as decisive of victory.
Ambition, avarice, personal animosity, party opposition, and many other motives not more laudable than these, are apt to operate as well upon those who support as those who oppose the right side of a question.
A zeal for different opinions concerning religion, concerning government, and many other points, as well of speculation as of practice; an attachment to different leaders ambitiously contending for pre-eminence and power; or to persons of other descriptions whose fortunes have been interesting to the human passions, have, in turn, divided mankind into parties, inflamed them with mutual animosity, and rendered them much more disposed to vex and oppress each other than to co-operate for their common good.
Infuriated by political animosity, the wives in many a noble household wearied their lords with prayers to give up their opposition to the Colour Bill; and some, finding their entreaties fruitless, fell on and slaughtered their innocent children and husband, perishing themselves in the act of carnage.
Immediately eight swords glittered in the rays of the setting sun, and the combat began with an animosity very natural between men twice enemies.
Upon issuing forth from his subterranean retreat at the expiration of five minutes, he found the abbe seated upon a wooden stool, leaning his elbow on a table, while Margotin, whose animosity seemed appeased by the unusual command of the traveller for refreshments, had crept up to him, and had established himself very comfortably between his knees, his long, skinny neck resting on his lap, while his dim eye was fixed earnestly on the traveller's face.
For this reason many consider that a wise prince, when he has the opportunity, ought with craft to foster some animosity against himself, so that, having crushed it, his renown may rise higher.