animosity


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an·i·mos·i·ty

 (ăn′ə-mŏs′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. an·i·mos·i·ties
1. Bitter hostility or open enmity; active hatred. See Synonyms at enmity.
2. A hostile feeling or act.

[Middle English animosite, from Old French, from Late Latin animōsitās, courage, from Latin animōsus, bold, from animus, soul, spirit; see anə- in Indo-European roots.]

animosity

(ˌænɪˈmɒsɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
a powerful and active dislike or hostility; enmity
[C15: from Late Latin animōsitās, from Latin animōsus spirited, from animus]

an•i•mos•i•ty

(ˌæn əˈmɒs ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
a feeling of ill will that tends to display itself in action; strong hostility or antagonism.
[1400–50; late Middle English animosite (< Middle French) < Late Latin animōsitās]

animosity

an active dislike or energetic hostility that leads to strong opposition.
See also: Attitudes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.animosity - a feeling of ill will arousing active hostilityanimosity - a feeling of ill will arousing active hostility
ill will, enmity, hostility - the feeling of a hostile person; "he could no longer contain his hostility"

animosity

animosity

noun
Deep-seated hatred, as between longtime opponents or rivals:
Translations
حِقْد، عِداء، بُغْضَاء
nenávistnepřátelství
fjendskabhaduvilje
fjandskapur
priešiškumas
naidsniknums
animozita

animosity

[ˌænɪˈmɒsɪtɪ] Nanimosidad f, rencor m

animosity

[ˌænɪˈmɒsɪti] nanimosité f
animosity towards sb → animosité envers qn

animosity

nAnimosität f (geh)(towards gegenüber), Feindseligkeit f(towards gegenüber)

animosity

[ˌænɪˈmɒsɪtɪ] nanimosità

animosity

(ӕniˈmosəti) noun
(a) strong dislike or hatred. The rivals regarded one another with animosity.

animosity

n. animosidad, rencor, aversión, mala voluntad;
v.
to have ___tener ___.
References in classic literature ?
To represent me as viewing it with ill-nature, animosity, or partisanship, is merely to do a very foolish thing, which is always a very easy one; and which I have disregarded for eight years, and could disregard for eighty more.
And thus doth it roll stones out of animosity and ill-humour, and taketh revenge on whatever doth not, like it, feel rage and ill-humour.
The conclusions deduced from these facts are unavoidable, and in stating them the author has been influenced by no feeling of animosity, either to the individuals themselves, or to that glorious cause which has not always been served by the proceedings of some of its advocates.
A zeal for different opinions concerning religion, concerning government, and many other points, as well of speculation as of practice; an attachment to different leaders ambitiously contending for pre-eminence and power; or to persons of other descriptions whose fortunes have been interesting to the human passions, have, in turn, divided mankind into parties, inflamed them with mutual animosity, and rendered them much more disposed to vex and oppress each other than to co-operate for their common good.
All that talk makes up her "name," which is handed over from one crew to another without bitterness, without animosity, with the indulgence of mutual dependence, and with the feeling of close association in the exercise of her perfections and in the danger of her defects.
The chief object of his animosity was, of course, Mimi, whose will had overcome his, but it was obscured in greater or lesser degree by all who had opposed him.
Infuriated by political animosity, the wives in many a noble household wearied their lords with prayers to give up their opposition to the Colour Bill; and some, finding their entreaties fruitless, fell on and slaughtered their innocent children and husband, perishing themselves in the act of carnage.
This mutual animosity was a good deal increased by their alternate successes; for Mrs Blifil knew what they would be at long before they imagined it; or, indeed, intended she should: for they proceeded with great caution, lest she should be offended, and acquaint Mr Allworthy.
36] has some concern and is even supposed to feel some animosity in the matter.
They repeatedly endeavoured to single out each other, spurred by mutual animosity, and aware that the fall of either leader might be considered as decisive of victory.
Monsieur," said he, "you know that is not so, and that the king has his own personal animosity against M.
And, let me add, there is no personal animosity on the part of Professor Beecher against you.