ankylosis


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Related to ankylosis: fibrous ankylosis

an·ky·lo·sis

also an·chy·lo·sis  (ăng′kə-lō′sĭs)
n.
1. The consolidation of bones or their parts to form a single unit.
2. The stiffening and immobility of a joint as the result of disease, trauma, surgery, or abnormal bone fusion.

[New Latin, from Greek ankulōsis, stiffening of the joints, from ankuloun, to crook, bend, from ankulos, crooked, bent.]

an′ky·lot′ic (-lŏt′ĭk) adj.

ankylosis

(ˌæŋkɪˈləʊsɪs) or

anchylosis

n
(Pathology) abnormal adhesion or immobility of the bones in a joint, as by a direct joining of the bones, a fibrous growth of tissues within the joint, or surgery
[C18: from New Latin, from Greek ankuloun to crook]
ankylotic, anchylotic adj

an•ky•lo•sis

(ˌæŋ kəˈloʊ sɪs)

n., pl. -lo•ses (-ˈloʊ siz)
1. abnormal adhesion of the bones of a joint.
2. the union or consolidation of two or more bones or other hard tissues into one.
[1705–15; < Greek: a stiffening of the joints. See ankylo-, -osis]
an`ky•lot′ic (-ˈlɒt ɪk) adj.

ankylosis

- Stiffness or immobility in a joint.
See also related terms for joint.

ankylosis

the stiffening of the joints of the body, a result of the formation of a fibrous or bony union.
See also: Disease and Illness
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ankylosis - abnormal adhesion and rigidity of the bones of a jointankylosis - abnormal adhesion and rigidity of the bones of a joint
pathology - any deviation from a healthy or normal condition
Translations

ankylosis

[ˌæŋkɪˈləʊsɪs] Nanquilosis f

an·ky·lo·sis

n. anquilosis, inflexibilidad o falta de movimiento de una articulación.

ankylosis

n anquilosis f
References in classic literature ?
It was labour, whose practical difference from the other forms of labour consisted in the nature of its risk, which did not lie in ankylosis, or lead poisoning, or fire-damp, or gritty dust, but in what may be briefly defined in its own special phraseology as "Seven years hard.
When there is minimal infraocclusion secondary to ankylosis and the child has limited anticipated future growth, restorative build-up of the occlusal surface maintains proximal contact integrity and prevents both supra-eruption of the opposing dentition and tilting of the adjacent teeth and short-term build up can be done with composite resin (Figure 4).
Common intrinsic, or intra-articular, causes include posttraumatic arthritis, joint incongruity, ankylosis of articular surfaces, articular adhesions, loose bodies, and osteoarthritis with bone spurs and proliferative synovitis.
Some of the causes are: prolonged retention or early loss of the deciduous canine, ankylosis, lack of space due to tooth size/ arch length discrepancies, anomalies in size and shape of adjacent lateral incisors or lack thereof, failure in the root resorption of the deciduous canine, excessive width of the palate, supernumerary teeth, trauma, dilaceration of the root, presence of an alveolar cleft, cleft lip and /or palate, premature closure of the root apex, rotation of the permanent tooth germ and transverse maxillary deficiency.
Ankylosis of the jaw leads to severe weight loss and the patient progresses to thoracic insufficiency syndrome due to costovertebral malformations with ankylosis of the costovertebral joints, ossification of intercostal muscles, paravertebral muscles and aponeuroses, as well as progressive spinal deformity including kyphoscoliosis or thoracic lordosis.
This case report discusses a case of total replacement resorption wherein two avulsed central incisors with an extra oral dry time of 5 min were reimplanted within 40 min and despite all the guidelines (3) being adhered to; total replacement resorption was seen over a period of seven years, contemplating the possible role of host response and also highlighting the fact that despite immaculate coronal seal or proper obturation; ankylosis followed by total replacement resorption could occur as in this case.
Ankylosis and narrowing of both wrist joints, erosions in MCP and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints and osteoporosis around joints, cystic changes, and joint space loss were seen on radiographic images.
Patient 1 was a full-term newborn transferred from another institution with a congenital anomaly that suggested ankylosis of the mandible.
Periapical radiographs confirmed the absence of periapical pathology or ankylosis and there have been no further complications since (Figure 6).
Widespread joint ankylosis can result in losses of both types of motion.
Type III###A: Glossopalantine ankylosis (Ankylossum
It's Ankylosis, a Greek word meaning "stiff joint" [1] is an intracapsular union of the disc condyle complex to temporal articular surface that restricts mandibular movement including the fibrous adhesion or bony fusion between condyles, disc, glenoid fossa and articular eminence.