annexation


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an·nex

 (ə-nĕks′, ăn′ĕks′)
tr.v. an·nexed, an·nex·ing, an·nex·es
1. To append or attach, especially to a larger or more significant thing.
2. To incorporate (territory) into an existing political unit such as a country, state, county, or city.
3. To add or attach, as an attribute, condition, or consequence.
n. (ăn′ĕks′, ăn′ĭks)
1. A building added on to a larger one or an auxiliary building situated near a main one.
2. An addition, such as an appendix, that is made to a record or other document.

[Middle English annexen, from Old French annexer, from Latin annectere, annex-, to connect : ad-, ad- + nectere, to bind; see ned- in Indo-European roots.]

an′nex·a′tion (ăn′ĭk-sā′shən) n.
an′nex·a′tion·al adj.
an′nex·a′tion·ism n.
an′nex·a′tion·ist n.

annexation

(ˌænɪkˈseɪʃən; -ɛk-)
n
1. the act of annexing, esp territory, or the condition of being annexed
2. something annexed
ˌannexˈational adj
ˌannexˈationism n
ˌannexˈationist n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.annexation - incorporation by joining or unitingannexation - incorporation by joining or uniting
incorporation - including by incorporating
2.annexation - the formal act of acquiring something (especially territory) by conquest or occupationannexation - the formal act of acquiring something (especially territory) by conquest or occupation; "the French annexation of Madagascar as a colony in 1896"; "a protectorate has frequently been a first step to annexation"
acquisition - the act of contracting or assuming or acquiring possession of something; "the acquisition of wealth"; "the acquisition of one company by another"

annexation

noun seizure, takeover, occupation, conquest, appropriation, annexing, expropriation, arrogation the country's annexation of its neighbour
Translations
ضَم، إلحاق
anexepřipojenízáborzabrané území
annektering
aneksija
hozzácsatolás
innlimun; viîtenging
anexia
ilhaktopraklarına katma

annexation

[ˌænekˈseɪʃən] Nanexión f

annexation

[ˌænɛkˈseɪʃən] n [country, state, region, territory] → annexion f

annexation

nAnnexion f

annexation

[ˌænɛkˈseɪʃn] nannessione f

annex

(əˈneks) verb
to take possession of (eg a country).
(ˈӕneks) (also ˈannexe)>noun
a building added to, or used as an addition to, another building. a hotel annexe.
ˌannexˈation (ӕ-) noun
References in classic literature ?
This annexation took place in the same way in which a foreign language is appropriated, namely, by translation.
Of this work of imagination poor Tess and her parents were naturally in ignorance--much to their discomfiture; indeed, the very possibility of such annexations was unknown to them; who supposed that, though to be well-favoured might be the gift of fortune, a family name came by nature.
annexations lack of the sanctifying merit of magnitude.
The great powers were first the United States, a nation addicted to commerce, but roused to military necessities by the efforts of Germany to expand into South America, and by the natural consequences of her own unwary annexations of land in the very teeth of Japan.
City officials in Mesquite and Pearland acknowledge the law has rushed their annexation plans but say annexation had been on their radar long before Gov.
Governor Greg Abbott today signed Senate Bill 6 (SB 6), which will reform and restrict the municipal annexation process.
Russia's annexation of the Crimean peninsula in March 2014 was legal, according to French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen.
Construction of a large plastics factory in northwest Eugene that would hire scores of workers has been held up for months because of a dispute between the company owner and city officials over the property's annexation into the city.
One Hundred Years After Japan's Forced Annexation of Korea: History and Tasks
Cemex filed an annexation petition with Greene County on July 1, according to city documents.
As they discussed the proposed annexation of Hasley Hills, North Bluff, Live Oak and the Valencia Commerce Center, some Town Council members disputed what they call false assumptions about annexation.
This article addresses the array of benefit and cost factors that should be considered when, as part of its growth policy, a city considers the annexation of adjacent or nearby unincorporated areas.