anthrax


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an·thrax

 (ăn′thrăks′)
n.
1. A serious infectious disease of mammals caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis, most commonly affecting grazing animals. The disease can be transmitted to humans by handling infected animals or contaminated animal products (resulting in cutaneous lesions), by ingesting contaminated meat, or by inhaling bacterial spores.
2. pl. an·thra·ces (-thrə-sēz′) Archaic A lesion caused by anthrax.

[Middle English antrax, malignant boil, from Latin anthrax, carbuncle, from Greek.]

anthrax

(ˈænθræks)
n, pl -thraces (-θrəˌsiːz)
1. (Veterinary Science) a highly infectious and often fatal disease of herbivores, esp cattle and sheep, characterized by fever, enlarged spleen, and swelling of the throat. Carnivores are relatively resistant. It is caused by the spore-forming bacterium Bacillus anthracis and can be transmitted to man
2. (Pathology) a pustule or other lesion caused by this disease
[C19: from Late Latin, from Greek: carbuncle]

an•thrax

(ˈæn θræks)

n., pl. -thra•ces (-θrəˌsiz)
an infectious disease of cattle, sheep, and other mammals caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis, transmitted to humans through wool and other animal products.
[1350–1400; Middle English antrax malignant boil or growth < Latin anthrax carbuncle < Greek ánthrax a coal, carbuncle]

an·thrax

(ăn′thrăks′)
An infectious, usually fatal disease of mammals, especially cattle and sheep, caused by a bacterium. It can spread to people, causing symptoms ranging from blistering of the skin to potentially fatal infection of the lungs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anthrax - a highly infectious animal disease (especially cattle and sheep)anthrax - a highly infectious animal disease (especially cattle and sheep); it can be transmitted to people
zoonosis, zoonotic disease - an animal disease that can be transmitted to humans
2.anthrax - a disease of humans that is not communicableanthrax - a disease of humans that is not communicable; caused by infection with Bacillus anthracis followed by septicemia
disease - an impairment of health or a condition of abnormal functioning
cutaneous anthrax, malignant pustule - a form of anthrax infection that begins as papule that becomes a vesicle and breaks with a discharge of toxins; symptoms of septicemia are severe with vomiting and high fever and profuse sweating; the infection is often fatal
anthrax pneumonia, inhalation anthrax, pulmonary anthrax, ragpicker's disease, ragsorter's disease, woolsorter's disease, woolsorter's pneumonia - a form of anthrax infection acquired by inhalation of dust containing Bacillus anthracis; initial symptoms (chill and cough and dyspnea and rapid pulse) are followed by extreme cardiovascular collapse
Translations
anthrax
pernarutto
antraksbedrenica
antraks

anthrax

[ˈænθræks] Nántrax m

anthrax

[ˈænθræks] nmaladie f du charbon

anthrax

n (Med, Vet) → Anthrax m (spec), → Milzbrand m; anthrax attackMilzbrandanschlag m; anthrax letterAnthrax-Brief m, Brief, der Sporen des Milzbranderregers enthält

anthrax

[ˈænθræks] n (Med) → antrace m

an·thrax

n. ántrax, infección estafilocócica causada por el Bacillus anthracis que da lugar a abscesos cutáneos profundos que pueden formar grandes pústulas. V.: Appendix C

anthrax

n carbunco, ántrax m (Ang)
References in periodicals archive ?
Anthrax is a disease of herbivorous animals caused by Bacillus anthracis and humans incidentally acquire the disease by handling infected dead animals and their products.
federal government laboratory in Atlanta may have been exposed to anthrax bacteria.
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7 million, to fund the further development of AV7909, a next generation anthrax vaccine candidate within Emergent's portfolio of anthrax countermeasures.
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Spores, Plagues, and History: The Story of Anthrax by Chris Holmes, MD
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Simulating an anthrax release, city and county workers stationed at folding tables handed out empty pill bottles to volunteers -- mostly students -- as officials kept count on the progress: The goal was 1,500 people an hour.
No cases of pulmonary anthrax have occurred since 1975.
Using specially designed submicroscopic capsules in tests on rats, scientists have neutralized the deadly toxin released by the bacterium that causes anthrax.