anthropology


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Related to anthropology: cultural anthropology

an·thro·pol·o·gy

 (ăn′thrə-pŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The scientific study of the origin, the behavior, and the physical, social, and cultural development of humans.
2. That part of Christian theology concerning the genesis, nature, and future of humans, especially as contrasted with the nature of God: "changing the church's anthropology to include more positive images of women" (Priscilla Hart).

an′thro·po·log′i·cal (-pə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl), an′thro·po·log′ic (-ĭk) adj.
an′thro·po·log′i·cal·ly adv.
an′thro·pol′o·gist n.

anthropology

(ˌænθrəˈpɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) the study of humans, their origins, physical characteristics, institutions, religious beliefs, social relationships, etc. See also cultural anthropology, ethnology, physical anthropology, social anthropology
anthropological adj
ˌanthropoˈlogically adv
ˌanthroˈpologist n

an•thro•pol•o•gy

(ˌæn θrəˈpɒl ə dʒi)

n.
the science that deals with the origins, physical and cultural development, biological characteristics, and social customs and beliefs of humankind.
[1585–95]
an`thro•po•log′i•cal (-pəˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) an`thro•po•log′ic, adj.
an`thro•po•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
an`thro•pol′o•gist, n.

an·thro·pol·o·gy

(ăn′thrə-pŏl′ə-jē)
The scientific study of humans, especially of their origin, their behavior, and their physical, social, and cultural development.

Anthropology

See also mankind; race

a specialty that studies the creative achievements of societies, especially those passed on through later generations. Also called culturology.
the theory and work based on the theory that trees were involved in the origin of man. — dendranthropologic, dendranthropological, adj.
ethnocentrism. — ethnocentric, adj.
the belief in the superiority of one’s own group or culture. Also ethnocentricity. — ethnocentric, adj.
the branch of ethnology that studies comparative legal systems.
the study of the origin of distinctive groups or tribes. — ethnogenist, n. — ethnogenic, adj.
the branch of anthropology that studies and describes the individual cultures of mankind. — ethnographer, n. — ethnographic, ethnographical, adj.
the study, often comparative, of the origins and development of the races of mankind. — ethnologist, n. — ethnologic, ethnological, adj.
the description of moral and ethical systems. — ethnographer, n. — ethnographic, ethnographical, adj.
the blending of diverse cultures or traditions.
a person who is a native or inhabitant of an isthmus. — isthmian, adj.
a lake-dweller.
people with smooth hair; a division of mankind characterized by people with such hair. Cf. Ulotrichi. — Leiotrichan, adj.
the state or custom of residing with the family or tribe of the wife, as in certain primitive societies. Cf. patrilocality. — matrilocal, adj.
the state or custom of residing with the family or tribe of the husband, as in certain primitive societies. Cf. matrilocality. — patrilocal, adj.
1. a subdivision of an ancient Greek tribe or phyle.
2. a clan or other unit of a primitive tribe.
the branch of anthropology that studies, describes, and interprets the evolutionary changes in man’s bodily structure and the classification of modern races. Cf. cultural anthropology. Also called somatology
the branch of anthropology that studies human societies, emphasizing interpersonal and intergroup relations.
physical anthropology.
the belief that a part of a person or object can act in place of the whole and thus that anything done to the part will equally affect the whole.
people with woolly, tightly curled, or crisp hair; a division of mankind characterized by people with such hair. — Ulotrichous, adj.

anthropology

1. The study of humankind, including origins, behavior, and institutions.
2. The study of the human race. Known in Britain as social anthropology. Anthropology differs from sociology largely because it developed from a different intellectual tradition. Early anthropologists were motivated by a desire to study primitive societies. On the other hand, the founding fathers of sociology (such as Durkheim, Weber, and Marx) were more concerned with an analysis of industrial societies.
3. The scientific study of humankind, including origins, behavior, religion, institutions, and social and cultural development.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anthropology - the social science that studies the origins and social relationships of human beingsanthropology - the social science that studies the origins and social relationships of human beings
ethos - (anthropology) the distinctive spirit of a culture or an era; "the Greek ethos"
eidos - (anthropology) the distinctive expression of the cognitive or intellectual character of a culture or a social group
kinship system - (anthropology) the system of social relationships that constitute kinship in a particular culture, including the terminology that is used and the reciprocal obligations that are entailed
social science - the branch of science that studies society and the relationships of individual within a society
archaeology, archeology - the branch of anthropology that studies prehistoric people and their cultures
descriptive anthropology, ethnography - the branch of anthropology that provides scientific description of individual human societies
ethnology - the branch of anthropology that deals with the division of humankind into races and with their origins and distribution and distinctive characteristics
physical anthropology - the branch of anthropology dealing with the genesis and variation of human beings
cultural anthropology, social anthropology - the branch of anthropology that deals with human culture and society
structural anthropology, structuralism - an anthropological theory that there are unobservable social structures that generate observable social phenomena
affine - (anthropology) kin by marriage
family relationship, kinship, relationship - (anthropology) relatedness or connection by blood or marriage or adoption
affinity - (anthropology) kinship by marriage or adoption; not a blood relationship
blood kinship, consanguinity, cognation - (anthropology) related by blood
endogamic, endogamous - pertaining to or characterized by the custom of marrying only within the limits of a clan or tribe
exogamic, exogamous - pertaining to or characterized by the custom of marrying only outside the limits of a clan or tribe
outbred - bred of parents not closely related; having parents of different classes or tribes
Mongoloid - of or pertaining to or characteristic of one of the traditional racial division of humankind including especially peoples of central and eastern Asia
Translations
antropologie
antropologi
antropologio
antropologia
antropologija
antropológiaembertan
mannfræðimannfræîi
人類学
인류학
antropologasantropologijaantropologinis
antropoloģija
antropológia
antropologi
มานุษยวิทยา
antropolojiinsan bilimiinsanbilimi
nhân chủng học

anthropology

[ˌænθrəˈpɒlədʒɪ] Nantropología f

anthropology

[ˌænθrəˈpɒlədʒi] nanthropologie f

anthropology

anthropology

[ˌænθrəˈpɒlədʒɪ] nantropologia

anthropology

(ӕnθrəˈpolədʒi) noun
the study of human society, customs, beliefs etc.
anthropoˈlogical (-ˈlo-) adjective
ˌanthroˈpologist noun

anthropology

الَأنْثروبولوجيا antropologie antropologi Anthropologie ανθρωπολογία antropología antropologia anthropologie antropologija antropologia 人類学 인류학 antropologie antropologi antropologia antropologia антропология antropologi มานุษยวิทยา insan bilimi nhân chủng học 人类学
References in classic literature ?
Does it not invoke, from the enlightened solicitude of the ministers of Public Instruction, the creation of chairs of anthropology,--a science in which Germany outstrips us?
Assistant-Keeper of Comparative Anthropology Department, 1893.
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He who has been denied the spectacle of a busy Manhattan broker during a rush of business is handicapped for the profession of anthropology.
After reading several books on anthropology, education, and didactics, Alexey Alexandrovitch drew up a plan of education, and engaging the best tutor in Petersburg to superintend it, he set to work, and the subject continually absorbed him.
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The course tutor, Jack Hunter, who is currently studying the experience of mediums during their trances has written anthropology of religion e-book; 'Why People Believe in Spirits, Gods and Magic' and has edited two books; 'Strange Dimensions: A Para-anthropology Anthology' and 'Talking with the Spirits'.
The seminar provides a platform for systematic theologians and ethicists to explore issues in theological anthropology in dialogue with philosophy and the natural and social sciences.
She studied at Oxford University and gained an MSc in forensic anthropology from Bradford University in 1999.
In this collection of papers, Lewis asserts that beginning in the 1960s anthropology came under serious critique as being merely an offshoot of colonialism, or even an example of "epistemic violence.
Throughout the paper I use "anthropology" to mean social (cultural) anthropology in the sense of the discipline conventionally studying other societies and cultures.

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