anti-Bolshevik

anti-Bolshevik

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who is opposed to Bolshevism
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) opposed to Bolshevism: anti-Bolshevik propaganda.
References in periodicals archive ?
Flowever, the revolution and the devolution of the Russian Army left a 600-kilometre gap between Baghdad and anti-Bolshevik Russian troops remaining loyal to the Tsar and the Triple Entente.
He worked with 007 anti-Bolshevik factions in Petrograd, but his plotting was discovered and he fled to avoid certain death.
It is impossible to say exactly how the trajectory of the Soviet Union -- established in 1922, after an extraordinarily destructive civil war in which a number of western powers intervened on the side of the anti-Bolshevik White Army -- would have varied had Lenin remained at its helm for longer.
White Russian is not only the name of a cocktail but also refers to anti-Bolshevik forces, including supporters of the Russian monarchy, during the civil war following the 1917 Russian revolution.
THE TOPIC: After the Red Army "liberated" Eastern Europe from Nazi control in 1945, the Soviet Union embarked on a systematic overhaul of every aspect of life in these predominantly rural, religious, and traditionally anti-Bolshevik nations, decimating Eastern European society and replacing it with pro-Communist institutions.
One was that the massive amounts of military supplies and equipment stockpiled at the Siberian port of Vladivostok and the northern Russian ports of Murmansk and Archangel had to be recovered for retrograde to their countries of origin or distribution to the anti-Bolshevik "White Russian" forces fighting the Bolshevik "Red" army in the Russian Civil War.
One of the leaders of the anti-Bolshevik forces in Siberia, Ungern-Sternberg and his army were pushed by the Bolsheviks into Mongolia, which had recently broken free from China.
When the war ended, he couldn't face retirement and got into many scrapes during the occupation of the Rhineland before offering his services and experience to the anti-Bolshevik forces in Russia.
A very senior SS officer told them that underground agents were to lie low after the war ended until they were told to organise anti-Bolshevik movements in their countries in order to "stir up unrest culminating in civil war".
Only 55 of them ever went 'up country' to Omsk, the capital of anti-Bolshevik Siberia, and there were only a couple of minor skirmishes with Red partisans in the Far East.
In 1918, Prime Minister Robert Borden appointed a special inquiry into the actions of radicals in Canada, which was headed up by a zealous anti-Bolshevik crusader and Montreal lawyer, Charles Cahan.