anticipate


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an·tic·i·pate

 (ăn-tĭs′ə-pāt′)
v. an·tic·i·pat·ed, an·tic·i·pat·ing, an·tic·i·pates
v.tr.
1.
a. To see as a probable occurrence; expect: We hadn't anticipated the crowds at the zoo. I anticipated that you might be in a hurry.
b. To think of (a future event) with pleasure; look forward to: She anticipated a pleasant hike in the country.
2.
a. To deal with beforehand; act so as to mitigate, nullify, or prevent: We anticipated the storm by boarding up the windows. See Synonyms at expect.
b. To react to (someone) abruptly, especially to prevent someone from continuing or progressing: "Immediately he regretted his words and started to add: 'I didn't know you lived out this way.' But Bloekman anticipated him by asking pleasantly: 'So how's your wife?'" (F. Scott Fitzgerald).
c. To act in a way that blocks or vitiates the action of (another): "Professor Thomson had anticipated me and had obtained many patents on this principle" (Nikola Tesla).
3. To serve as a forerunner to or previous indication of: Her research in the previous decade anticipated these findings.
4. To use in advance, as income not yet available.
5. To pay (a debt) before it is due.
v.intr.
To think, speak, or write about a matter in advance.

[Latin anticipāre, anticipāt-, to take before : ante-, ante- + capere, to take; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]

an·tic′i·pat′a·ble adj.
an·tic′i·pa′tor n.
an·tic′i·pa·to′ry (-pə-tôr′ē) adj.
Usage Note: Traditionally, the verb anticipate has been used to mean "to deal with in advance, to forestall" (as in We anticipated the storm by boarding up the windows, which was accepted by 70 percent of the Usage Panel in 2014). Some commentators have frowned on the more recent usage that means "expect or look forward to," as in He is anticipating a visit from his son. But this usage has become increasingly accepted, with approval rates that grew from 62 percent in 1964 to 87 percent in 2002 and 95 percent in 2014. Even when the anticipated event is expressly stated to be positive, with no possible need for preventive or compensatory measures, as in We are anticipating a pleasant hike in the country, 93 percent of the Panel approved the usage (up from 81 percent in 2002). The fact that the Panelists now rate the "expect" sense higher than the "forestall" sense shows that the newer one is actually supplanting the old as the primary meaning of anticipate. There is a third sense, "to act in a way that blocks or vitiates the action of another" as in I ran to answer the doorbell but found my brother had anticipated me and let the guests in, where the object of anticipate is the one whose plans are rendered unnecessary rather than the plans themselves. A bit more than half of the Usage Panel accepted this sense of the verb, which is best considered uncommon but acceptable.

anticipate

(ænˈtɪsɪˌpeɪt)
vb (mainly tr)
1. (may take a clause as object) to foresee and act in advance of: he anticipated the fall in value by selling early.
2. to thwart by acting in advance of; forestall: I anticipated his punch by moving out of reach.
3. (also intr) to mention (something) before its proper time: don't anticipate the climax of the story.
4. (may take a clause as object) to regard as likely; expect; foresee: he anticipated that it would happen.
5. to make use of in advance of possession: he anticipated his salary in buying a house.
6. (Banking & Finance) to pay (a bill, etc) before it falls due
7. to cause to happen sooner: the spread of nationalism anticipated the decline of the Empire.
[C16: from Latin anticipāre to take before, realize beforehand, from anti- ante- + capere to take]
anˈticiˌpator n
anˈticipatory, anˈticipative adj
anˈticipatorily, anˈticipatively adv
Usage: The use of anticipate to mean expect should be avoided

an•tic•i•pate

(ænˈtɪs əˌpeɪt)

v. -pat•ed, -pat•ing. v.t.
1. to realize or feel beforehand; foretaste or foresee: to anticipate pleasure.
2. to expect; look forward to, esp. confidently or with pleasure.
3. to perform (an action) before another has had time to act.
4. to answer (a question), obey (a command), or satisfy (a request) before it is made.
5. to forestall or nullify by taking countermeasures in advance: to anticipate an attack.
6. to consider or mention before the proper time.
7. to foreshadow the creation of: inventions anticipated by Leonardo da Vinci.
8.
a. to expend (funds) before they are legitimately available for use.
b. to discharge (an obligation) before it is due.
v.i.
9. to think, speak, act, or feel an emotional response in advance.
[1525–35; < Latin anticipātus, past participle of anticipāre to take beforehand, anticipate]
an•tic′i•pat`a•ble, adj.
an•tic′i•pa`tive•ly, adv.
an•tic′i•pa`tor, n.

anticipate


Past participle: anticipated
Gerund: anticipating

Imperative
anticipate
anticipate
Present
I anticipate
you anticipate
he/she/it anticipates
we anticipate
you anticipate
they anticipate
Preterite
I anticipated
you anticipated
he/she/it anticipated
we anticipated
you anticipated
they anticipated
Present Continuous
I am anticipating
you are anticipating
he/she/it is anticipating
we are anticipating
you are anticipating
they are anticipating
Present Perfect
I have anticipated
you have anticipated
he/she/it has anticipated
we have anticipated
you have anticipated
they have anticipated
Past Continuous
I was anticipating
you were anticipating
he/she/it was anticipating
we were anticipating
you were anticipating
they were anticipating
Past Perfect
I had anticipated
you had anticipated
he/she/it had anticipated
we had anticipated
you had anticipated
they had anticipated
Future
I will anticipate
you will anticipate
he/she/it will anticipate
we will anticipate
you will anticipate
they will anticipate
Future Perfect
I will have anticipated
you will have anticipated
he/she/it will have anticipated
we will have anticipated
you will have anticipated
they will have anticipated
Future Continuous
I will be anticipating
you will be anticipating
he/she/it will be anticipating
we will be anticipating
you will be anticipating
they will be anticipating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been anticipating
you have been anticipating
he/she/it has been anticipating
we have been anticipating
you have been anticipating
they have been anticipating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been anticipating
you will have been anticipating
he/she/it will have been anticipating
we will have been anticipating
you will have been anticipating
they will have been anticipating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been anticipating
you had been anticipating
he/she/it had been anticipating
we had been anticipating
you had been anticipating
they had been anticipating
Conditional
I would anticipate
you would anticipate
he/she/it would anticipate
we would anticipate
you would anticipate
they would anticipate
Past Conditional
I would have anticipated
you would have anticipated
he/she/it would have anticipated
we would have anticipated
you would have anticipated
they would have anticipated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.anticipate - regard something as probable or likelyanticipate - regard something as probable or likely; "The meteorologists are expecting rain for tomorrow"
guess, reckon, suppose, think, imagine, opine - expect, believe, or suppose; "I imagine she earned a lot of money with her new novel"; "I thought to find her in a bad state"; "he didn't think to find her in the kitchen"; "I guess she is angry at me for standing her up"
assume, presume, take for granted - take to be the case or to be true; accept without verification or proof; "I assume his train was late"
hypothesise, hypothesize, speculate, conjecture, theorise, theorize, hypothecate, suppose - to believe especially on uncertain or tentative grounds; "Scientists supposed that large dinosaurs lived in swamps"
pass judgment, evaluate, judge - form a critical opinion of; "I cannot judge some works of modern art"; "How do you evaluate this grant proposal?" "We shouldn't pass judgment on other people"
await, expect, wait, look - look forward to the probable occurrence of; "We were expecting a visit from our relatives"; "She is looking to a promotion"; "he is waiting to be drafted"
believe, trust - be confident about something; "I believe that he will come back from the war"
2.anticipate - act in advance of; deal with ahead of time
act, move - perform an action, or work out or perform (an action); "think before you act"; "We must move quickly"; "The governor should act on the new energy bill"; "The nanny acted quickly by grabbing the toddler and covering him with a wet towel"
3.anticipate - realize beforehand
know - be aware of the truth of something; have a belief or faith in something; regard as true beyond any doubt; "I know that I left the key on the table"; "Galileo knew that the earth moves around the sun"
4.anticipate - make a prediction about; tell in advance; "Call the outcome of an election"
read - interpret the significance of, as of palms, tea leaves, intestines, the sky; also of human behavior; "She read the sky and predicted rain"; "I can't read his strange behavior"; "The fortune teller read his fate in the crystal ball"
hazard, guess, venture, pretend - put forward, of a guess, in spite of possible refutation; "I am guessing that the price of real estate will rise again"; "I cannot pretend to say that you are wrong"
outguess, second-guess - attempt to anticipate or predict
augur - predict from an omen
bet, wager - maintain with or as if with a bet; "I bet she will be there!"
forecast, calculate - predict in advance
prophesy, vaticinate - predict or reveal through, or as if through, divine inspiration
5.anticipate - be excited or anxious aboutanticipate - be excited or anxious about    
await, expect, wait, look - look forward to the probable occurrence of; "We were expecting a visit from our relatives"; "She is looking to a promotion"; "he is waiting to be drafted"
quail at, apprehend - anticipate with dread or anxiety
6.anticipate - be a forerunner of or occur earlier thananticipate - be a forerunner of or occur earlier than; "This composition anticipates Impressionism"
hap, happen, occur, come about, take place, go on, pass off, fall out, pass - come to pass; "What is happening?"; "The meeting took place off without an incidence"; "Nothing occurred that seemed important"

anticipate

verb
1. expect, predict, forecast, prepare for, look for, hope for, envisage, foresee, bank on, apprehend, foretell, think likely, count upon We could not have anticipated the result of our campaigning.
2. await, look forward to, count the hours until We are all eagerly anticipating the next match.
3. pre-empt, intercept, forestall, second-guess, beat (someone) to it You've anticipated my next question.
Usage: The Bank of English reveals that the use of anticipate and expect as synonyms is well established. However, although both words relate to a person's knowledge of something that will happen in the future, there are subtle differences in meaning that should be understood when choosing which word to use. Anticipate means that someone foresees an event and has prepared for it, while expect means `to regard something as probable', but does not necessarily suggest the state of being prepared. Similarly, using foresee as a synonym of anticipate, as in they failed to foresee the vast explosion in commercial revenue which would follow, is not entirely appropriate.

anticipate

verb
1. To know in advance:
2. To look forward to confidently:
await, bargain for (or on), count on, depend on (or upon), expect, look for, wait (for).
Informal: figure on.
Translations
يَتَوَقَّعيَسْتَبِق
předpokládatpředvídat
forudseforvente
ennakoidaodottaavarautua
sjá fyrirvænta
lauktinekantrumastikėtis
gaidītnojaustparedzēt
pričakovati
beklemekönceden tahmin etmekummak

anticipate

[ænˈtɪsɪpeɪt]
A. VT
1. (= expect) [+ trouble, pleasure] → esperar, contar con
this is worse than I anticipatedesto es peor de lo que esperaba
the police anticipated troublela policía esperaba disturbios, la policía contaba con que hubiera disturbios
I anticipate seeing him tomorrowespero or cuento con verlo mañana
as anticipatedsegún se esperaba, como esperábamos
the anticipated audience did not materializeno apareció el público que se esperaba or con que se había contado
an eagerly-anticipated eventun acontecimiento muy esperado
to anticipate thatprever que ..., calcular que ...
do you anticipate that this will be easy?¿crees que esto va a resultar fácil?
we anticipate that he will come in spite of everythingcontamos con que or esperamos que venga a pesar de todo
2. (= foresee) [+ event] → prever; [+ question, objection, wishes] → anticipar
anticipated cost (Comm) → coste m previsto
anticipated profitbeneficios mpl previstos
3. (= forestall) [+ person] → anticiparse a, adelantarse a; [+ event] → anticiparse a, prevenir
you have anticipated my wishesusted se ha anticipado or adelantado a mis deseos
you have anticipated my orders (wrongly) → usted ha actuado sin esperar mis órdenes
B. VI (= act too soon) → anticiparse

anticipate

[ænˈtɪsɪpeɪt] vt (= expect, foresee) [+ event, problem, result] → s'attendre à, prévoir; [+ wishes, request] → aller au devant de, devancer
Fortunately, they had anticipated this question → Heureusement, ils s'étaient attendus à cette question.
This is worse than I anticipated
BUT C'est pire que je ne pensais.
as anticipated → comme prévu

anticipate

vt
(= expect)erwarten; as anticipatedwie vorausgesehen or erwartet
(= see in advance)vorausberechnen, vorhersehen; (= see in advance and cater for) objection, need etczuvorkommen (+dat); he always has to anticipate what his opponent will do nexter muss immer vorhersehen können or vorausahnen, was sein Gegner als Nächstes tun wird; don’t anticipate what I’m going to saynimm nicht vorweg, was ich noch sagen wollte
(= do before sb else)zuvorkommen (+dat); in his discovery he was anticipated by othersbei seiner Entdeckung sind ihm andere zuvorgekommen; a phrase which anticipates a later theme (Mus) → eine Melodie, die auf ein späteres Thema vor(aus)greift
(= do, use, act on prematurely) incomeim Voraus ausgeben; inheritanceim Voraus in Anspruch nehmen
vi (manager, driver, chess player etc)vorauskalkulieren

anticipate

[ænˈtɪsɪpeɪt] vt
a. (expect, trouble) → prevedere, aspettarsi; (pleasure) → pregustare, assaporare in anticipo
this is worse than I anticipated → è peggio di quel che immaginavo or pensavo
to anticipate that ... → prevedere che...
I anticipate seeing him tomorrow → presumo or mi immagino che lo vedrò domani
as anticipated → come previsto
b. (forestall, person) → prevenire, precedere; (foresee, event) → prevedere; (question, objection, wishes) → prevenire

anticipate

(ӕnˈtisəpeit) verb
1. to expect (something). I'm not anticipating any trouble.
2. to see what is going to be wanted, required etc in the future and do what is necessary. A businessman must try to anticipate what his customers will want.
anˌticiˈpation noun
I'm looking forward to the concert with anticipation (= expectancy, excitement).

an·tic·i·pate

vt. anticipar, prevenir.
References in classic literature ?
All perceived that more was meant than was uttered, and each one believed that the hidden meaning was precisely such as his own faculties enabled him to understand, or his own wishes led him to anticipate.
You force me to anticipate a disclosure I expected to make to you only when I came to ask permission to woo your daughter Jessie; and when I tell you what it is, you will understand that I have no right to criticise your conduct.
The similarity, intellectual and moral, between the Judge and his ancestor appears to have been at least as strong as the resemblance of mien and feature would afford reason to anticipate.
Perhaps you cannot,--but she felt as sure, in that hour, that God had had mercy on her, and that she should see her daughter,--as she did, months afterwards,--when--but we anticipate.
Why is it not more apt to anticipate and provide for reform?
You will have much pleasure in being in London, and especially in being together; and if Elinor would ever condescend to anticipate enjoyment, she would foresee it there from a variety of sources; she would, perhaps, expect some from improving her acquaintance with her sister-in-law's family.
Rochester, you must neither expect nor exact anything celestial of me--for you will not get it, any more than I shall get it of you: which I do not at all anticipate.
You can well afford to indulge their passing whims as long as their business is to anticipate all your desires.
Possibly at home, but of a certainty impossible for handmaid to anticipate intentions of Miss Pross, as to admission or denial of the fact.
At first I was in daily dread of his taking my education in hand again, or of Miss Murdstone's devoting herself to it; but I soon began to think that such fears were groundless, and that all I had to anticipate was neglect.
I prefer not to anticipate my communication here; you will impart as much or as little of it as you please to your friends afterwards; I have nothing to do with that.
His natural irresolution and moral cowardice were exaggerated by a position in which dreaded consequences seemed to press equally on all sides, and his irritation had no sooner provoked him to defy Dunstan and anticipate all possible betrayals, than the miseries he must bring on himself by such a step seemed more unendurable to him than the present evil.