anticonvulsant


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to anticonvulsant: Anticonvulsant Drugs

an·ti·con·vul·sant

 (ăn′tē-kən-vŭl′sənt, ăn′tī-)
n.
A drug that prevents or relieves convulsions.

an′ti·con·vul′sive (-sĭv) adj.

anticonvulsant

(ˌæntɪkənˈvʌlsənt)
n
(Pharmacology) any of a class of drugs used to prevent or abolish convulsions
adj
(Pharmacology) of or relating to this class of drugs

an•ti•con•vul•sant

(ˌæn ti kənˈvʌl sənt, ˌæn taɪ-)
adj.
1. used to control or prevent convulsions.
n.
2. an anticonvulsant drug or substance.
[1940–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anticonvulsant - a drug used to treat or prevent convulsions (as in epilepsy)anticonvulsant - a drug used to treat or prevent convulsions (as in epilepsy)
Emeside, ethosuximide, Zarontin - an anticonvulsant drug (trade names Emeside and Zarontin) used to treat petit mal epilepsy
gabapentin, Neurontin - an anticonvulsant (trade name Neurontin) used to control some types of seizures in the treatment of epilepsy; also used to manage neuralgia caused by shingles
hydantoin - any of a group of anticonvulsant drugs used in treating epilepsy
medicament, medication, medicinal drug, medicine - (medicine) something that treats or prevents or alleviates the symptoms of disease
mephenytoin, Mesantoin - a toxic anticonvulsant drug (trade name Mesantoin) used in the treatment of epilepsy when less toxic anticonvulsants have been ineffective
Mebaral, mephobarbital - a long-acting crystalline barbiturate (trade name Mebaral) used as a sedative and as an anticonvulsant in the treatment of epilepsy
Gemonil, metharbital - anticonvulsant drug (trade name Gemonil) used in the treatment of epilepsy
Milontin, phensuximide - anticonvulsant (trade name Milontin) used to treat petit mal
Mysoline, primidone - an anticonvulsant (trade name Mysoline) used to treat grand mal seizures and essential tremor
Depokene, valproic acid - anticonvulsant (trade name Depokene) used to prevent some kinds of seizures
Translations

an·ti·con·vul·sant

n. anticonvulsivo, medicamento usado en la prevención de convulsiones o ataques.

anticonvulsant

adj & n antiepiléptico, anticonvulsivante m
References in periodicals archive ?
Further, there were no differences in the mean FSIQ scores between children who were rated as having features of the anticonvulsant facies and those who were mildly affected (such as having nail hypoplasia) or unaffected by exposure.
SAN FRANCISCO -- Anticonvulsants are known to cause birth defects when taken during pregnancy, but physicians should weigh the benefits and risks before discontinuing anticonvulsant therapy, Jennifer R.
The epilepsy studies involved more than 100 patients and generated data supportive of Ganaxolone's efficacy and safety in the treatment of both children and adults suffering from refractory epilepsy (patients who continue to have seizures even when taking multiple anticonvulsant drugs).
The aims of this study were to characterize the chemical ingredients of American skullcap and to evaluate its anticonvulsant activity.
Levetiracetam is an anticonvulsant that has been related to a number of adverse psychiatric effects.
The anticonvulsant effects of KD develop slowly with chronic ingestion but the molecular mechanisms that underlie its actions remain unidentified.
New research supported by the National Institutes of Healtha[euro](tm)s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) shows that the anticonvulsant medication gabapentin, which is used for certain types of seizures, can be an effective treatment for the pain and other symptoms associated with the common, often hard-to-treat chronic pain disorder, fibromyalgia.
Klonopin: Potentially addictive anticonvulsant to treat anxiety.
The federal Medicare program is requiring that all the new Part D prescription plans cover "'all or substantially all' of the drugs in the antidepressant, antipsychotic, anticonvulsant, anticancer, immunosuppressant and HIV/AIDS categories.
2) The newer nonaromatic anticonvulsant, lamotrigine, has also been associated with the hypersensitivity syndrome.
The role of anticonvulsant medications in the treatment of SUDs has resulted from a combination of psychopharmacologic tourism and therapeutic application of scientific constructs and principles.
The link between anticonvulsant agents and suicidal acts or violent death--first revealed in a Food and Drug Administration meta-analysis in 2008--appears to have been confirmed for four of the drugs: gabapentin, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, and tiagabine, according to a report in JAMA.