antifemale

antifemale

(ˌæntɪˈfiːmeɪl)
adj
opposed to or discriminating against women
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References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps it's not the latest comments from Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump we should be most worried about, but the fact that this taxavoiding, racist, antifemale sleazeball can get the support of a large part of the US electorate.
As such, he places himself in opposition to those who engage in antifemale disputes, even if only for the sake of fun or banter.
In the Consolation, Boethius's Muses are explicitly described as deviant women--Lady Philosophy calls the Muses scenicas meretriculas and Sirenes, and she also uses antifemale rhetoric in her critique of Fortune.
Warshaw similarly finds serious fault with fraternities and all-male sports teams, arguing that "[f]raternity rituals, skits, even publications often have obscene, antifemale content" and that "[f]raternity members themselves are often unapologetic for being part of an environment that demands loyalty to a belief system that often objectifies and denigrates women.
In a comprehensive review of existing survey data on undernutrition in developing countries, Marcoux (2002) finds that "once noted'' antifemale biases in China "are no longer found in national surveys taken at more recent dates" (which refer to late 1980s and early 1990s).
Tragically, many young people die before their own reproduction, and in some large countries antifemale bias skews sex ratios toward a preponderance of males.
As Benedict points out, "The soldierly identity [women] have to assume is an antifemale, male-defined identity.
There are also several antifemale passages from contemporaries and near-contemporaries like Petrarch, whose Remediae fortunae offers "Now you have a woman to rule over you .
Except the women in Bush's administration have two important traits in common: They've sworn their allegiance to the corporate world, and they have connections to fight-wing foundations that espouse antifemale policies.
an antifemale message would have been more plausible, and they could
Rather, as happens with any system of belief, secondary interpreters and "scholars" introduce their own biases, and patriarchy being what it is, those biases come out as antifemale dogma in secondary texts.
Patsy Mink of Hawaii likewise attacked the "pervasive nature" of antifemale bias in the educational system.