antigrowth

antigrowth

(ˌæntɪˈɡrəʊθ)
adj
acting to restrict or prevent growth
References in periodicals archive ?
The problems associated with urban life in North America have reached intolerable levels and strong antigrowth groups in many US and Canadian cities had succeeded in implementing legislation designed to curtail further development.
The growth machine versus the antigrowth coalition: The battle for a communities.
The growth and antigrowth positions come in radical and moderate versions, accompanied by very different views on the role of technologies in our future.
I believe that the tax policies in place before we got to Washington," he charged, "were antigrowth, antipeople.
But it has also been escalated by the Federal Reserve's attempt to counter the drag of the antigrowth policies of the federal government and to stimulate artificially the economy through its $4 trillion quantitative easing policy--a policy that drove short-term interest rates nearly to zero.
Genetic mutations allow the growth to be self-sufficient, insensitive to antigrowth signals and apoptotic activity, limitless replication, loss of basement membrane contact and sustained angiogenesis
Median incomes appear to have stagnated since the 2008 financial crisis and employment trends have deteriorated, but these serious problems likely reflect demographics and an antigrowth policy environment, not a failure of IT.
The effect of this chromosomal (genetic) damage is the impairment of cell regulatory processes which lead to acquired capabilities within cells such as self-sufficiency in growth signals, insensitivity to antigrowth signals, evading apoptosis, limitless replicative potential, sustained angiogenesis and tissue invasion and metastasis.
Being pro- farmer is not being antigrowth," Gandhi said.
The fact that very few, if any, antigrowth activists are openly demanding that poor countries remain poor tells us how powerful a force growth is in today's global politics.
The downfall of Imperial Spain was hastened by land confiscations, antigrowth property tights, economic incentives that encouraged such "unproductive careers" as soldiering and the priesthood, and the expulsion of hundreds of thousands of commercially innovative Jews.
Kotkin (2010: 214) outlines explicitly 'why America cannot easily adopt antigrowth attitudes'.