antimarket

antimarket

(ˌæntɪˈmɑːkɪt)
adj
opposed to or working against commerce
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, they prefer government rules that make it harder to fire workers, surely an antimarket policy.
Busch has called the minimum wage "an antimarket regulation," cites the Koch brothers as an inspiration, and hosted a conference at the Trump International Hotel in Washington earlier this year where he praised the president for being a staunch "pro-life" leader.
129, 139-41 (2004) (criticizing commercialization theory as "fundamentally antimarket," but noting that the regulatory barriers in the pharmaceutical industry make it the strongest candidate for application of that theory).
6) Both stress how Stalin's outlook and ideas--such as, for example, his deeply antimarket instincts and his views of the peasantry--closed off policy options and influenced such momentous shifts as the end of the New Economic Policy (NEP).
They can only be obtained and maintained if there are significant moral and institutional constraints on the use of violence, deception, and other antimarket means.
Proponents of these antimarket regulations frame the debate in terms of fairness or equity, while those who argue against them too often rely on negative monetary effects.
I]t is only important to note that such informal economic activity can only become normal in an antimarket, unwatched by, and excluded from, the social and economic dynamics beyond its borders.
He voted against the most recent farm bill, arguing that the subsidy-fueled legislation was antimarket.
At least since the 19th century, the notion of authorship and the practice of paying for writing have been the cornerstone of the publishing industry and have survived even the most anticapitalism, antimarket years after the founding of the People's Republic (Han, 2010).
MK: If Fluxus was supposedly antimarket, Capitalist Realism was all about the market--and yet they both deployed multiples and serial reproduction and aimed at mass distribution and publicity.
In more non-Western countries than Americans would care to admit, free and fair elections would bring to power antimarket, anti-American leaders.
Larry Summers, a leading candidate to take the helm at the Fed after Ben Bernanke, called him an antimarket Luddite.