antinomianism


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an·ti·no·mi·an·ism

 (ăn′tĭ-nō′mē-ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. Christianity The doctrine or belief that the Gospel frees Christians from required obedience to any law, whether scriptural, civil, or moral, and that salvation is attained solely through faith and the gift of divine grace.
2. The belief that moral laws are relative in meaning and application as opposed to fixed or universal.

antinomianism

the belief that Christians are freed from the moral law by the virtue of God’s grace. — antinomian, n., adj.
See also: Theology
the theological doctrine maintaining that Christians are freed from both moral and civil law by God’s gift of grace. — antinomian, antinomist, n.
See also: Law
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.antinomianism - the theological doctrine that by faith and God's grace a Christian is freed from all laws (including the moral standards of the culture)
theological doctrine - the doctrine of a religious group
References in classic literature ?
Mysticism, with its marvellous power of making common things strange to us, and the subtle antinomianism that always seems to accompany it, moved him for a season; and for a season he inclined to the materialistic doctrines of the Darwinismus movement in Germany, and found a curious pleasure in tracing the thoughts and passions of men to some pearly cell in the brain, or some white nerve in the body, delighting in the conception of the absolute dependence of the spirit on certain physical conditions, morbid or healthy, normal or diseased.
I'll send it over to you; and there are some other books that you may like to see, Irwine--pamphlets about Antinomianism and Evangelicalism, whatever they may be.
She was great at Antinomianism and Bible- classes, and was plainly going to hold a class now.
Others devoted themselves to the worrying of churches and meetings for public worship; and the fertile forms of antinomianism among the elder puritans seemed to have their match in the plenty of the new harvest of reform.
Its radical elements are balanced by conservative qualifications, there is a constant mixture of legalism and antinomianism, and the emphasis repeatedly switches from rigor and militancy to acquiescence and the acceptance of suffering.
The antinomianism that Paul fought so fervently against in the first century is apparent in the indiscriminate nature of our modern food choices.
This organic approach allows Green to situate Sufism more subtly within a rich cross-current of intellectual and spiritual developments, rather than emphasizing adversarial features such as its oft-claimed antinomianism or anti-intellectualism.
Reaganism, Lilia argued, was "an extension of the same utopian vision" as the antinomianism of the '60s--one viewing economic freedom as an inalienable right, the other individual personal and sexual expression.
The transition period to a mature understanding of what a poet might accomplish came in the 1830s as Emerson admitted his profound antinomianism, as he read deeply in European writers, and as his own life went through the crises of his wife's death and his departure from the church.
Rowland sees Paul as both a "mystic" and "broker of divine mysteries" (200, 201), as well as being a key source for Blake's antinomianism.
Facing life that is an ambiguous mixture of freedom and fallenness, Christians wanting to avoid antinomianism on the one hand can fall into legalism on the other, and in either case, the presenting obscurity persists.
The two tendencies within Universalism ultimately resulted in a split in 1831, with the majority affirming antinomianism.