antinomianism


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an·ti·no·mi·an·ism

 (ăn′tĭ-nō′mē-ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. Christianity The doctrine or belief that the Gospel frees Christians from required obedience to any law, whether scriptural, civil, or moral, and that salvation is attained solely through faith and the gift of divine grace.
2. The belief that moral laws are relative in meaning and application as opposed to fixed or universal.

antinomianism

the belief that Christians are freed from the moral law by the virtue of God’s grace. — antinomian, n., adj.
See also: Theology
the theological doctrine maintaining that Christians are freed from both moral and civil law by God’s gift of grace. — antinomian, antinomist, n.
See also: Law
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.antinomianism - the theological doctrine that by faith and God's grace a Christian is freed from all laws (including the moral standards of the culture)
theological doctrine - the doctrine of a religious group
References in classic literature ?
She was great at Antinomianism and Bible- classes, and was plainly going to hold a class now.
Mysticism, with its marvellous power of making common things strange to us, and the subtle antinomianism that always seems to accompany it, moved him for a season; and for a season he inclined to the materialistic doctrines of the Darwinismus movement in Germany, and found a curious pleasure in tracing the thoughts and passions of men to some pearly cell in the brain, or some white nerve in the body, delighting in the conception of the absolute dependence of the spirit on certain physical conditions, morbid or healthy, normal or diseased.
I'll send it over to you; and there are some other books that you may like to see, Irwine--pamphlets about Antinomianism and Evangelicalism, whatever they may be.
Others devoted themselves to the worrying of churches and meetings for public worship; and the fertile forms of antinomianism among the elder puritans seemed to have their match in the plenty of the new harvest of reform.
There Wesley appears to have shared the concern about antinomianism that motivated the Council of Trent to condemn a "rash presumption of predestination" (praedestinationis temeraria praesumptio) and an "absolute certainty" (absoluta certitudo) of perseverance.
A phrase like "semiotics of redeemed Christian character" (210) is simply baffling, as is the last sentence in the chapter on Brown: "What will prove useful to future aspirants to national authorship is Clara's gift of a secularized antinomianism to a future literary corpus that makes possible, as a sign of the fiction's legitimacy, not the representation of troth but rather a moment of presence, of direct communication, that is both staged and authentic" (258).
In Dryden's construction, the forces of antinomianism, contractualism, and freethinking individualism come impulsively to the aid of beleaguered monarchy, and a comparably progressive monarchy welcomes such seemingly revolutionary forces into a community of legitimate values.
Kristol, noting that religious conservativism has become an active political force, writes: "We have lived through a century of ever more extreme hedonism, antinomianism, personal and sexual individualism, licentiousness .
But both, however reluctantly, still pay tribute to Freud, both give handsome acknowledgements to Richard Poirier and both share, in the end, the basic cultural antinomianism of our time.
The diverse sources of Blake's 'bricolage' in popular dissent and intellectual radical scepticism are examined in chapters on popular traditions of millenarianism and antinomianism, literary primitivism, mythography, and scriptural criticism.
Part four, entitled "The Broader Intellectual Tradition," deals with Confucianism and Taoism in Tsung-mi's thought and compares Tsung-mi's attempt to provide an ontological basis for the affirmation of traditional Buddhist practices with a similar turn of thought taken, in opposition to Buddhist antinomianism, by the seminal Neo-Confucian thinker Chu Hsi (1130-1200).
Antinomianism was one of the two extreme extensions (heresies) that threatened the orthodox middle way of 17th-century Calvinism in and around Massachusetts Bay.