antipapal


Related to antipapal: antipope

antipapal

(ˌæntɪˈpeɪpəl)
adj
(Roman Catholic Church) opposed to the pope
References in periodicals archive ?
Record of Henry's attendance in 1535 at an antipapal interlude that dramatized himself attacking the bishops might also have some relevance for the Epiphany interlude.
More than simply an expression of antipapal sentiment, however, the rioters' excessive violence, Dickens's novel suggests, is symptomatic of a state already plagued by a general disregard for human life.
Although much of this Latin material was deleted from the second 1570 edition, testifying to what King terms "the progressive vernacularity of the Book of Martyrs" (118), the work continued to grow, swollen by antipapal argument and invective whose inclusion struck a nationalistic chord with Foxe's English readership.
2) The possession of William Tyndale's translation of the New Testament (1526), or of any of Tyndale's antipapal tracts, which he wrote under the influence of Lutheran ideas, (3) for example, provides evidence for the reception of continental Protestantism without government intervention.
The bishop's introduction in 1637 of a formal liturgy to the antipapal Scots resulted in outrage among the people of Brechin.
That Rosicrucianism is non-Roman, if not anti-Roman, is clear from the explicit texts, such as that of the Confessio, (6) which is declaredly antipapal.
The decision of the Swiss cantons was shared by Protestant Germany, where antipapal sentiment and fear of a Catholic plot also dictated resolve.
A month after his election, when he extended a general amnesty to political prisoners and exiles, his Bolognese subjects were in "universal joy": "Strange manifestations of exultation in a city as antipapal as Bologna has shown herself until now," wrote the nineteenth-century chronicler Enrico Bottrigari.
The response to the absolute dictates of Catholicism came in the form of a powerful antipapal reaction in western Christianity that gave birth to Protestantism.
46) There is an interesting connection between the antipapal stance of the Catholic left and its hostility to commercial society and their embrace of massive and intrusive political institutions.
Although in early nineteenth-century Great Britain there were still scholars who saw the Commedia as the work of a Roman Catholic, more and more of them regarded it as the undertaking of a rebellious, antipapal figure.
As the Italian historian Claudio Rendina has written, Pasquino 'speaks without respite with a voice which is simultaneously academic and amateur, clerical and antipapal, encomiastic and slanderous, politically committed and light-heartedly disengaged, decorous and foulmouthed, noble and, ultimately, plebeian.