antiphrasis


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an·tiph·ra·sis

 (ăn-tĭf′rə-sĭs)
n.
The use of a word or phrase in a sense contrary to its normal meaning for ironic or humorous effect, as in a mere babe of 40 years.

[Late Latin, from Greek, from antiphrazein, to express by the opposite : anti-, anti- + phrazein, to speak; see phrase.]

antiphrasis

(ænˈtɪfrəsɪs)
n
(Rhetoric) rhetoric the use of a word in a sense opposite to its normal one, esp for ironic effect
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek, from anti- + phrasis, from phrazein to speak]

an•tiph•ra•sis

(ænˈtɪf rə sɪs)

n.
the use of a word in a sense opposite to its proper meaning, esp. for ironic effect.
[1525–35; < Latin < Greek, derivative of antiphrázein to speak the opposite]
an•ti•phras•tic (ˌæn tɪˈfræs tɪk) adj.
an`ti•phras′ti•cal•ly, adv.

antiphrasis

the satirical or humorous use of a word or phrase to convey an idea exactly opposite to its real significance, as Shakespeare’s “honorable men” for Caesar’s murderers. — antiphrastic, adj.
See also: Literature
the use of a word in a sense opposite to its proper meaning. — antiphrastic, antiphrastical, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

antiphrasis

The use of a word to mean the opposite of its usual meaning, especially for ironic effect.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.antiphrasis - the use of a word in a sense opposite to its normal sense (especially in irony)
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)
irony - a trope that involves incongruity between what is expected and what occurs
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The language of consumerism is used to satirise the body of consumerism through antiphrasis.
My favourite car back in the garage in the UK is the complete antiphrasis of a McLaren, and that's a Morgan.
Antiphrasis, as it is technically called, is the use of an expression to mean the opposite of its usual sense, for instance saying that's wonderful when one really thinks something is terrible.
The audience hears what they expect to hear: whoever is touched by the charcoals will feel no fire, in antiphrasis with the real meaning.