antiquity


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an·tiq·ui·ty

 (ăn-tĭk′wĭ-tē)
n. pl. an·tiq·ui·ties
1. Ancient times, especially the times preceding the Middle Ages.
2. The people, especially the writers and artisans, of ancient times: inventions unknown to antiquity.
3. The quality of being old or ancient; considerable age: a carving of great antiquity.
4. often antiquities Something, such as an object or a relic, belonging to or dating from ancient times.

antiquity

(ænˈtɪkwɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the quality of being ancient or very old: a vase of great antiquity.
2. the far distant past, esp the time preceding the Middle Ages in Europe
3. the people of ancient times collectively; the ancients

an•tiq•ui•ty

(ænˈtɪk wɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the quality of being ancient; ancientness: a bowl of great antiquity.
2. ancient times; former ages.
3. the period of history before the Middle Ages.
4. antiquities, things belonging to or remaining from ancient times, as monuments, relics, or customs.
5. the peoples, nations, or cultures of ancient times.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French < Latin]

Antiquity


a person who lived before the Flood. — antediluvian, adj.
an interest in the customs, art, and social structure of earlier peoples and civilizations. — antiquarian, n., adj.
the field of description of antiquities. — archaeographical, adj.archaeographer, n.
the scientific study of human remains and artifacts. — archaeologist, archeologist, n.archeologie, archaeologic, archeological, archaeological, adj.
the study of the language and culture of ancient Assyria. — Assyriologist, n.Assyriological, adj.
the principles or style of classic art or literature. — classicist, n.
the study of ancient Egyptian language, history, and culture. — Egyptologist, n.Egyptological, adj.
the deciphering and interpreting of ancient inscriptions. — epigraphist, epigrapher, n.epigraphic, epigraphical, adj.
the study of Etruscan civilization, especially its artifacts and language. — Etruscologist, n.
Ancient Greek culture and ideals. — Hellenist, n.
Rare. the research and composition of treatises about relics. — lipsanographer, n.
the study of mummies.
the study of ancient writings, including inscriptions. — paleographer, palaeographer, n.paleographic, palaeographic, adj. papyrology the study of ancient writings on papyrus. — papyrologist, n.
a person who lived after the Flood. — post-diluvian, adj.
the policies and actions distinctive of ancient Rome.

antiquity

A thing, such as a ruin or an object, that dates from ancient times.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.antiquity - the historic period preceding the Middle Ages in Europeantiquity - the historic period preceding the Middle Ages in Europe
lustrum - a ceremonial purification of the Roman population every five years following the census
catacomb - an underground tunnel with recesses where bodies were buried (as in ancient Rome)
circus - (antiquity) an open-air stadium for chariot races and gladiatorial games
galley - (classical antiquity) a crescent-shaped seagoing vessel propelled by oars
bay wreath, laurel wreath, laurel - (antiquity) a wreath of laurel foliage worn on the head as an emblem of victory
pantheon - (antiquity) a temple to all the gods
toga virilis - (ancient Rome) a toga worn by a youth as a symbol of manhood and citizenship
humour, humor - (Middle Ages) one of the four fluids in the body whose balance was believed to determine your emotional and physical state; "the humors are blood and phlegm and yellow and black bile"
dithyramb - (ancient Greece) a passionate hymn (usually in honor of Dionysus)
pean, paean - (ancient Greece) a hymn of praise (especially one sung in ancient Greece to invoke or thank a deity)
torch race - (ancient Greece) in which a torch is passed from one runner to the next
Ana - mother of the ancient Irish gods; sometimes identified with Danu
Lug, Lugh - ancient Celtic god
Egyptian deity - a deity worshipped by the ancient Egyptians
Ra, Re - ancient Egyptian sun god with the head of a hawk; a universal creator; he merged with the god Amen as Amen-Ra to become the king of the gods
Semitic deity - a deity worshipped by the ancient Semites
Persian deity - a deity worshiped by the ancient Persians
Chinese deity - a deity worshipped by the ancient Chinese
Greek deity - a deity worshipped by the ancient Greeks
Roman deity - a deity worshipped by the ancient Romans
Bacchus - (classical mythology) god of wine; equivalent of Dionysus
Norse deity - a deity worshipped by the ancient Norsemen
Phrygian deity - deity of the ancient Phrygians of west central Asia Minor
augur, auspex - (ancient Rome) a religious official who interpreted omens to guide public policy
centurion - (ancient Rome) the leader of 100 soldiers
choragus - (ancient Greece) leader of a group or festival; leader of a chorus
gladiator - (ancient Rome) a professional combatant or a captive who entertained the public by engaging in mortal combat
pontifex - a member of the highest council of priests in ancient Rome
procurator - (ancient Rome) someone employed by the Roman Emperor to manage finance and taxes
sibyl - (ancient Rome) a woman who was regarded as an oracle or prophet
tribune - (ancient Rome) an official elected by the plebeians to protect their interests
history - the aggregate of past events; "a critical time in the school's history"
historic period, age - an era of history having some distinctive feature; "we live in a litigious age"
Romanic, Roman - of or relating to or derived from Rome (especially ancient Rome); "Roman architecture"; "the old Roman wall"
2.antiquity - extreme oldnessantiquity - extreme oldness      
oldness - the quality of being old; the opposite of newness
3.antiquity - an artifact surviving from the pastantiquity - an artifact surviving from the past
artefact, artifact - a man-made object taken as a whole
antique - any piece of furniture or decorative object or the like produced in a former period and valuable because of its beauty or rarity
relic - an antiquity that has survived from the distant past
Roman building - a building constructed by the ancient Romans
stela, stele - an ancient upright stone slab bearing markings

antiquity

noun
1. distant past, ancient times, time immemorial, olden days famous monuments of classical antiquity
2. old age, age, oldness, ancientness, elderliness a town of great antiquity
3. antique, ruin, relic collectors of Roman antiquities
Translations
آثار مِن العُصور القَديمَةمِن العَصْر القَديم
antikapravěkstarověkstarověké památky
ældeantikkenfortidsminderfra gammel tidoldsager
antika
antikvitásókorókoriak
ævafornfornmunirfornöld
pravekstarovekstaroveká pamiatka
antikalıkeski çağlareski eserlereskilik

antiquity

[ænˈtɪkwɪtɪ] N
1. (= age, ancient times) → antigüedad f
of great antiquitymuy antiguo
high antiquityremota antigüedad
in antiquityen la antigüedad, en el mundo antiguo
2. antiquitiesantigüedades fpl

antiquity

[ænˈtɪkwɪti] n
(= ancient times) → antiquité f
(= relic) → antiquité f

antiquity

n
(= ancient times)das Altertum; (= Roman, Greek antiquity)die Antike; in antiquityim Altertum/in der Antike
(= great age)großes Alter; of great antiquityuralt
antiquities pl (= old things)Altertümer pl

antiquity

[ænˈtɪkwɪtɪ] nantichità
of great antiquity → molto antico/a

antique

(ӕnˈtiːk) adjective
1. old and usually valuable. an antique chair.
2. old or old-fashioned. That car is positively antique.
3. (of a shop etc) dealing in antiques. an antique business.
noun
something made long ago (usually more than a hundred years ago) which is valuable or interesting. He collects antiques.
antiquated (ˈӕntikweitid) adjective
old or out of fashion. an antiquated car.
antiquity (ӕnˈtikwəti) noun
1. ancient times, especially those of the ancient Greeks and Romans. the gods and heroes of antiquity.
2. great age. a statue of great antiquity.
3. (plural anˈtiquities) something remaining from ancient times (eg a statue, a vase). Roman antiquities.
References in classic literature ?
Nor must we forget to mention a hen-coop of very reverend antiquity that stood in the farther corner of the garden, not a great way from the fountain.
But there was Hester, clad in her gray robe, still standing beside the tree-trunk, which some blast had overthrown a long antiquity ago, and which time had ever since been covering with moss, so that these two fated ones, with earth's heaviest burden on them, might there sit down together, and find a single hour's rest and solace.
They flanked opposite ends of the house and were probably architectural absurdities, redeemed in a measure indeed by not being wholly disengaged nor of a height too pretentious, dating, in their gingerbread antiquity, from a romantic revival that was already a respectable past.
I account that man more honorable than that great captain of antiquity who boasted of taking as many walled towns.
As he talked along, softly, pleasantly, flowingly, he seemed to drift away imperceptibly out of this world and time, and into some remote era and old forgotten country; and so he gradually wove such a spell about me that I seemed to move among the specters and shadows and dust and mold of a gray antiquity, holding speech with a relic of it
Everywhere in the town were the mold and decay that go with antiquity, and evidence of it; but I do not know that anything else gave us so vivid a sense of the old age of Heilbronn as those footworn grooves in the paving-stones.
The large front chambers I thought especially grand: and some of the third-storey rooms, though dark and low, were interesting from their air of antiquity.
Belonging to the younger branch of a family of great antiquity, the one inheritance of importance that he had derived from his ancestors was the possession of a magnificent library, which not only filled all the rooms in his modest little dwelling, but lined the staircases and passages as well.
After peeping into several wine-shops, she stopped at the sign of the Good Republican Brutus of Antiquity, not far from the National Palace, once (and twice) the Tuileries, where the aspect of things rather took her fancy.
Murdstone: which I couldn't satisfy myself about by any means, I seemed to have bitten him in such a remote antiquity.
The English author, on the other hand, without supposing him less of a conjuror than the Northern Warlock, can, you observed, only have the liberty of selecting his subject amidst the dust of antiquity, where nothing was to be found but dry, sapless, mouldering, and disjointed bones, such as those which filled the valley of Jehoshaphat.
It is to be observed, that these ambassadors spoke to me, by an interpreter, the languages of both empires differing as much from each other as any two in Europe, and each nation priding itself upon the antiquity, beauty, and energy of their own tongue, with an avowed contempt for that of their neighbour; yet our emperor, standing upon the advantage he had got by the seizure of their fleet, obliged them to deliver their credentials, and make their speech, in the Lilliputian tongue.