antiromantic

antiromantic

(ˌæntɪrəʊˈmæntɪk)
adj
opposed to romanticism
n
a person opposed to romanticism
References in periodicals archive ?
The middle classes wrote for the masses with the intention of improving their lives and circumstances, providing didactic, antiromantic short stories and biographies which bore the message of self-education and self-improvement.
The Don Juan story has been spun out into dozens, perhaps hundreds, of different versions over the past four centuries, pressed into the service of many different orbits of concern--there is Don Juan the romantic, Don Juan the antiromantic, Don Juan the existentialist, Don Juan the social-Darwinist, Don Juan the feminist even, and so forth.
To deploy Nixon's own antiromantic, antipastoral terminology, the Bruneaus, Petitjeans, Alexanders, and Holcombes belong to the category of "ecosystem people": "those hundreds of millions who depend for their livelihood on modest resource catchment areas" (22).
Enacting this antiromantic stance, Scalapino's language often suppresses affect and remains provocatively flat.
Mendelson does not reduce Auden to an antiRomantic jester.
Unsettling, as it does, both the values and the function of the imperial romance within British society, at such moments the narrator of Outcast exposes itself as a kind of genric and ideological contradiction--an antiromantic narrator telling a romantic tale.
Stephen Huebner opens the Volume with a creatively intertextual essay on Ravel and the notion of classicism, which he treats as a network of antiromantic concepts linked closely with poets whom Ravel admired or who were part of his artistic circle.
9) It is an openly failed antiromantic experiment, for Keats registers the futility of the ironic in this text just as he does the authentic.
1924), an early World War I play by Maxwell Anderson and Laurence Stallings, famously presented an antiromantic view of war.
In contrast, Leopold is resolutely antiromantic, however much he shares a deep appreciation of the beauty of nature.
The claim for Frost's antiromantic stance, meanwhile, is often staked on his supposedly antagonistic view of nature: nature as adversary, as a "destructive unintelligibility" opposed to an exclusively human "creative intelligence," as Frank Lentricchia puts it, whose ministrations wrest disorder into form (10).
As an antiromantic tale, it recounts the untold and often catastrophic histories of the actual women behind the Tudor accession such as those of Elizabeth Woodville, Princess Elizabeth, Lady Brampton, Jane Shore, and Lady Katherine Gordon.