antitakeover

an·ti·take·o·ver

 (ăn′tē-tāk′ō′vər, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Of, relating to, or constituting measures or statutes intended to prevent hostile acquisition of one company in certain situations, such as one in which the acquisition is intended to eliminate competition.

antitakeover

(ˌæntɪˈteɪkəʊvə)
adj
(Commerce) opposed to or acting against a takeover
References in periodicals archive ?
In particular, Mahoney and Mahoney (1993) studied provisions adopted between 1974-1988 and found that negative stockholder reaction to antitakeover provisions increased over time.
Gompers, Ishii, and Metrick, 2003; Bebchuk and Cohen, 2005; Core, Guay, and Rusticus, 2006; Bebchuk, Cohen, and Ferrell, 2009; Wang and Xie, 2009), we use four indices of antitakeover provisions to proxy for the quality of corporate governance.
Control, Antitakeover Defenses, and the Perils of Federal Intervention,
139) Incorporation information is thus relevant to capture the differences between states' antitakeover (or pro-takeover) stances and, more generally, the extent to which a state legislation can be considered as more managerial-friendly or shareholder-friendly.
They find that acquirers with more antitakeover provisions experience significantly lower announcement-period abnormal stock returns.
Thus, the evidence documented by Hotchkiss (1995) could be related with the early time horizon, especially considering the higher antitakeover leverage of firms in the 1980s.
predominantly on three kinds of antitakeover statutes: business
627 (2013) (analyzing share price reactions to two important Delaware court decisions affecting the stringency of antitakeover provisions).
Typically, critics of short-termism support stronger antitakeover protections in order to encourage longterm corporate investment.
Hence, they reveal that the adoption of antitakeover amendments exacerbates agency problems by restricting shareholder rights and increasing managerial entrenchment.
An example of a specific business association rule would be an antitakeover statute.
As a result of the removal of antitakeover provisions, acquisitions and capital expenditures fall and firm valuation increases in the long-run.