antitypical


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an·ti·type

 (ăn′tĭ-tīp′)
n.
1. One that is foreshadowed by or identified with an earlier symbol or type, such as a figure in the New Testament who has a counterpart in the Old Testament.
2. An opposite or contrasting type.

[Medieval Latin antitypus, from Late Greek antitupos, copy, antitype, from Greek, corresponding, representing : anti-, equal to, like; see anti- + tupos, print, impression.]

an′ti·typ′i·cal (-tĭp′ĭ-kəl) adj.
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Adj.1.antitypical - of or relating to an antitype
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References in periodicals archive ?
In leading the study, Albion preaches unionization as a practice grounded in the truth of Scripture and comes to understand his leading the miners into better working conditions as an antitypical instantiation of Moses leading the Exodus.
Similarly, although one might give an antitypical reading of the use of Black English--a language that resists the metaphysical commitments and political norms of the wider society--this does not establish that Black English is being utilized in such a transgressive fashion.
By demanding that the Jews "bible" (724) or drink the powdered remains of the priests and then later reducing Maria to the eating of the shoulder of her child, the Siege-poet highlights the contaminated Eucharistic structure behind these antitypical acts.