anvil


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an·vil

 (ăn′vĭl)
n.
1.
a. A heavy block of iron or steel with a smooth, flat top on which metals are shaped by hammering.
b. Something resembling an anvil, as in shape or function.
2. The fixed jaw in a set of calipers against which an object to be measured is placed.
3. Anatomy See incus.

[Middle English anfilt, from Old English; see pel- in Indo-European roots.]

anvil

(ˈænvɪl)
n
1. (Metallurgy) a heavy iron or steel block on which metals are hammered during forging
2. any part having a similar shape or function, such as the lower part of a telegraph key
3. (Mechanical Engineering) the fixed jaw of a measurement device against which the piece to be measured is held
4. (Anatomy) anatomy the nontechnical name for incus
[Old English anfealt; related to Old High German anafalz, Middle Dutch anvilte; see on, felt2]

an•vil

(ˈæn vɪl)

n.
1. a heavy iron block with a smooth face, frequently of steel, on which heated metals are hammered into desired shapes.
2. anything having a similar form or use.
3. the fixed jaw in certain measuring instruments.
4. incus.
[before 900; Middle English anvelt, anfelt, Old English anfilt(e), anfealt, c. Middle Dutch anvilte, Old High German anafalz. See on, felt2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anvil - a heavy block of iron or steel on which hot metals are shaped by hammeringanvil - a heavy block of iron or steel on which hot metals are shaped by hammering
block - a solid piece of something (usually having flat rectangular sides); "the pyramids were built with large stone blocks"
smithy, forge - a workplace where metal is worked by heating and hammering
2.anvil - the ossicle between the malleus and the stapesanvil - the ossicle between the malleus and the stapes
auditory ossicle - ossicles of the middle ear that transmit acoustic vibrations from the eardrum to the inner ear
middle ear, tympanic cavity, tympanum - the main cavity of the ear; between the eardrum and the inner ear
Translations
سِنْدان
kovadlina
ambolt
alasi
alasin
enclumeincus
üllõ
steîji
incus
priekalas
lakta
nákova
бабка

anvil

[ˈænvɪl] Nyunque m

anvil

[ˈænvɪl] nenclume f

anvil

nAmboss m (also Anat)

anvil

[ˈænvɪl] nincudine f

anvil

(ˈӕnvil) noun
a block, usually of iron, on which metal objects (eg horse-shoes) are hammered into shape. the blacksmith's anvil.
References in classic literature ?
This whale, among the English of old vaguely known as the Trumpa whale, and the Physeter whale, and the Anvil Headed whale, is the present Cachalot of the French, and the Pottsfich of the Germans, and the Macrocephalus of the Long Words.
While yet a little distance from the forge, moody Ahab paused; till at last, Perth, withdrawing his iron from the fire, began hammering it upon the anvil --the red mass sending off the sparks in thick hovering flights, some of which flew close to Ahab.
If we look at it in another way, we see how absurd it is: if I had an anvil in me would I prize it?
Now the reality was in my hold, I only felt that I was dusty with the dust of small coal, and that I had a weight upon my daily remembrance to which the anvil was a feather.
Tell me, Anselmo, if Heaven or good fortune had made thee master and lawful owner of a diamond of the finest quality, with the excellence and purity of which all the lapidaries that had seen it had been satisfied, saying with one voice and common consent that in purity, quality, and fineness, it was all that a stone of the kind could possibly be, thou thyself too being of the same belief, as knowing nothing to the contrary, would it be reasonable in thee to desire to take that diamond and place it between an anvil and a hammer, and by mere force of blows and strength of arm try if it were as hard and as fine as they said?
The pace of the horses was so fleet that their steps resounded like the blows of a blacksmith on his anvil.
Then as the water from the broken vase Gushes, or on the mailed horseman falls The anvil din of steel, as on the silk The slash of rending, so upon the strings Her plectrum fell.
The heifer was brought in from the plain, and Telemachus's crew came from the ship; the goldsmith brought the anvil, hammer, and tongs, with which he worked his gold, and Minerva herself came to accept the sacrifice.
The bellows blew, and the hammer clanged continually upon the anvil, while the blacksmiths were repairing the broken weapons of other wars.
Among several persons collected about the doorsteps, the most remarkable was a sturdy mountaineer, of six feet two and corresponding bulk, with a heavy set of features, such as might be moulded on his own blacksmith's anvil, but yet indicative of mother wit and rough humor.
Her father, Chad, frightened lest he should be "laid hold on" too, this impression on the rebellious Bess striking him as nothing less than a miracle, walked hastily away and began to work at his anvil by way of reassuring himself.
It becomes our disagreeable duty to record here, that the acts of Benjamin now became violent; for he darted his sledge-hammer violently on the anvil of Mr.