anvil

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an·vil

 (ăn′vĭl)
n.
1.
a. A heavy block of iron or steel with a smooth, flat top on which metals are shaped by hammering.
b. Something resembling an anvil, as in shape or function.
2. The fixed jaw in a set of calipers against which an object to be measured is placed.
3. Anatomy See incus.

[Middle English anfilt, from Old English; see pel- in Indo-European roots.]

anvil

(ˈænvɪl)
n
1. (Metallurgy) a heavy iron or steel block on which metals are hammered during forging
2. any part having a similar shape or function, such as the lower part of a telegraph key
3. (Mechanical Engineering) the fixed jaw of a measurement device against which the piece to be measured is held
4. (Anatomy) anatomy the nontechnical name for incus
[Old English anfealt; related to Old High German anafalz, Middle Dutch anvilte; see on, felt2]

an•vil

(ˈæn vɪl)

n.
1. a heavy iron block with a smooth face, frequently of steel, on which heated metals are hammered into desired shapes.
2. anything having a similar form or use.
3. the fixed jaw in certain measuring instruments.
4. incus.
[before 900; Middle English anvelt, anfelt, Old English anfilt(e), anfealt, c. Middle Dutch anvilte, Old High German anafalz. See on, felt2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anvil - a heavy block of iron or steel on which hot metals are shaped by hammeringanvil - a heavy block of iron or steel on which hot metals are shaped by hammering
block - a solid piece of something (usually having flat rectangular sides); "the pyramids were built with large stone blocks"
smithy, forge - a workplace where metal is worked by heating and hammering
2.anvil - the ossicle between the malleus and the stapesanvil - the ossicle between the malleus and the stapes
auditory ossicle - ossicles of the middle ear that transmit acoustic vibrations from the eardrum to the inner ear
middle ear, tympanic cavity, tympanum - the main cavity of the ear; between the eardrum and the inner ear
Translations
سِنْدان
kovadlina
ambolt
alasi
alasin
enclumeincus
üllõ
steîji
incus
priekalas
lakta
nákova
бабка

anvil

[ˈænvɪl] Nyunque m

anvil

[ˈænvɪl] nenclume f

anvil

nAmboss m (also Anat)

anvil

[ˈænvɪl] nincudine f

anvil

(ˈӕnvil) noun
a block, usually of iron, on which metal objects (eg horse-shoes) are hammered into shape. the blacksmith's anvil.
References in classic literature ?
While yet a little distance from the forge, moody Ahab paused; till at last, Perth, withdrawing his iron from the fire, began hammering it upon the anvil --the red mass sending off the sparks in thick hovering flights, some of which flew close to Ahab.
While I am hammering on the anvil, you sleep on the mat; and when I begin to eat after my toil, you wake up and wag your tail for food.
Then he led him by dark passages to a smith's forge, took an axe, and with one blow struck an anvil into the ground.
Now the reality was in my hold, I only felt that I was dusty with the dust of small coal, and that I had a weight upon my daily remembrance to which the anvil was a feather.
Ye know only the sparks of the spirit: but ye do not see the anvil which it is, and the cruelty of its hammer!
If we look at it in another way, we see how absurd it is: if I had an anvil in me would I prize it?
His hand brought the circlet of red- yellow, as though it were a plate of red gold, of refined gold smelted over the edge of the anvil, to his brow as a sign of his charioteering, as a distinction to his master.
On this the mighty monster hobbled off from his anvil, his thin legs plying lustily under him.
Silk-gowned professor of languages, give your arm to this sturdy blacksmith, and deem yourself honored by the conjunction, though you behold him grimy from the anvil.
For a brazen anvil falling down from heaven nine nights and days would reach the earth upon the tenth: and again, a brazen anvil falling from earth nine nights and days would reach Tartarus upon the tenth.
In the middle of this chamber, two smiths, with hammers, stood beside an anvil.
The bellows blew, and the hammer clanged continually upon the anvil, while the blacksmiths were repairing the broken weapons of other wars.