anxiously


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

anx·ious

 (ăngk′shəs, ăng′shəs)
adj.
1. Uneasy and apprehensive about an uncertain event or matter; worried.
2. Attended with, showing, or causing anxiety: spent an anxious night waiting for the test results.
3. Usage Problem Eagerly or earnestly desirous.

[From Latin ānxius, from angere, to torment; see angh- in Indo-European roots.]

anx′ious·ly adv.
anx′ious·ness n.
Usage Note: Anxious has a long history of use as a synonym for eager, but some prefer that anxious be used only to describe those who are worried or uneasy, as in the sentence He's anxious about his upcoming surgery. The acceptability of anxious to mean eager has been increasing, however. In our 1999 survey of the Usage Panel, 47 percent approved of the sentence We are anxious to see the new show of British sculpture at the museum, whereas in 2014, this sentence was acceptable to 57 percent of panelists. The acceptability was higher for this usage in a sentence about a situation with a tinge of uneasiness: After a four-hour bus ride, the children were anxious to get outside (acceptable to 69 percent of the Panel in 1999 and 78 percent in 2014). Although resistance to the use of anxious to mean eager is waning, writers should be aware that there are still those who frown upon using the word in situations where no anxiety is present.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.anxiously - with anxiety or apprehensionanxiously - with anxiety or apprehension; "we watched anxiously"
Translations
بِقَلَق
úzkostlivě
bekymret
meî kvíîa
endişeyleistekle

anxiously

[ˈæŋkʃəslɪ] ADV
1. (= worriedly) [look, wait] → con preocupación, con inquietud
"am I boring you?" she said, anxiously-¿te aburro? -dijo con ansiedad
2. (= keenly, eagerly) → ansiosamente, con ansiedad

anxiously

[ˈæŋkʃəsli] adv [say] → anxieusement

anxiously

adv
(= keenly)gespannt

anxiously

[ˈæŋkʃəslɪ] advansiosamente, con ansia

anxious

(ˈӕŋkʃəs) adjective
1. worried about what may happen or have happened. She is anxious about her father's health.
2. causing worry, fear or uncertainty. an anxious moment.
3. wanting very much (to do etc something). He's very anxious to please.
ˈanxiously adverb
anxiety (aŋˈzaiəti) noun
His health is a great anxiety to me; filled with anxiety about her child's health.
References in classic literature ?
Jo saw that her mother's eyes filled and her lips trembled as she spoke, and fearing that she had said too much, she whispered anxiously, "Was it wrong to watch you and to speak of it?
After the wagon containing the berry pickers had passed, he went across the field through the tall mustard weeds and climbing a rail fence peered anxiously along the road to the town.
He jumped to his feet, his eyes snapping, and he looked eagerly and anxiously at Professor Bumper.
She had been crying, I could see, but when I opened my eyes she smiled, peered at me anxiously, and sat down on the foot of my bed.
He took her arm and led her away, looking anxiously and continuously down into her face.
The travelers anxiously regarded the upright, flexible figure of the young Mohican, graceful and unrestrained in the attitudes and movements of nature.
They evidently saw the approaching hour when the Long Knife would disposess them of their desirable habitations; and anxiously concerned for futurity, determined utterly to extirpate the whites out of Kentucke.
She thrust forth her head from the lattice, and looked anxiously upward Beyond the shadow of a doubt, this venerable witch-lady had heard Mr.
Blantyre came running to the gate; he looked anxiously about, and just caught sight of the flying figure, now far away on the road.
Marks, who was anxiously and with much fidgeting compounding a tumbler of punch to his own peculiar taste, occasionally looked up from his employment, and, poking his sharp nose and chin almost into Haley's face, gave the most earnest heed to the whole narrative.
Elton, on his return, made his own indifference as evident and indubitable as she could not doubt he would anxiously do, she could not imagine Harriet's persisting to place her happiness in the sight or the recollection of him.
And Thomas (who has never yet been in any other place than ours) spoke so gratefully of my dear father's unvarying kindness to him, and asked so anxiously to be allowed to go on serving us while his little savings lasted, that Magdalen and I forgot all formal considerations and both shook hands with him.