aorist


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a·o·rist

 (ā′ər-ĭst)
n.
1. A form of a verb in some languages, such as Classical Greek, that expresses action without indicating its completion or continuation.
2. A form of a verb in some languages, such as Classical Greek or Sanskrit, that in the indicative mood expresses past action.

[From Greek aoristos, indefinite, aorist tense : a-, not; see a-1 + horistos, definable (from horizein, to define; see horizon).]

aorist

(ˈeɪərɪst; ˈɛərɪst)
n
(Grammar) grammar a tense of the verb in classical Greek and in certain other inflected languages, indicating past action without reference to whether the action involved was momentary or continuous. Compare perfect8, imperfect4
[C16: from Greek aoristos not limited, from a-1 + horistos restricted, from horizein to define]
ˌaoˈristic adj
ˌaoˈristically adv

a•o•rist

(ˈeɪ ə rɪst)

n.
1. a verb tense, as in Classical Greek, expressing action, esp. in the past, without further implication as to completion, duration, or repetition.
adj.
2. of or in this tense.
[1575–85; < Greek aóristos unlimited]
a`o•ris′tic, adj.
a`o•ris′ti•cal•ly, adv.

aorist

A simple past tense, especially in ancient Greek, that does not imply continuance or momentariness.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aorist - a verb tense in some languages (classical Greek and Sanskrit) expressing action (especially past action) without indicating its completion or continuation
tense - a grammatical category of verbs used to express distinctions of time
Translations
Aorist
aoristni

aorist

[ˈɛərɪst] Naoristo m

aorist

nAorist m
References in classic literature ?
Besides, the aorist [Greek] in its present surrounding is perplexing.
We therefore espouse the view that the perfect denotes a present state resulting from a former event that can be expressed by the VP in the aorist.
Following Adams (1981: 23; 1988: 133-34), Saito argues rather that the reflexes of PIE present and aorist active participles in *-(o)nt- were responsible for the remodeling of PP inflection in TA (pp.
Baum's discussion of the morphology of the imperative takes up the individual endings of this category and discusses the relationship of the imperative to the modal aorist injunctive.
Grammatical abbreviations ALL allative suffix ANTER anterior suffix -ee AOR aorist conjugation BENEF benefactive verb suffix -al CONJ conjunctive verb affix -a CONN connective suffix (singular -u/plural -i) di/d imperfective predicative nexus marker COMPEMPH complement-emphatic focusing conjugation SUBJEMPH subject-emphatic focusing conjugation VBEMPH verb-emphatic focusing conjugation FACT factitive verb suffix -al FOC lexical-subject-focusing suffix -a FUT future conjugation formed with di + perfect inflection IMPER imperative conjugation IMPERF imperfective suffix -y ITER iterative verb suffix -aat NEG negative conjugation or negative suffix -ul OPR object pronoun PARTIC exclamatory particle PAST past suffix - (w) oon PFT perfect conjugation PRED imperfective predicative auxiliary (cf.
More likely, the form reflects an underlying root aorist avrta 's/he has chosen' or 'has preferred'.
In the aorist tense, Nganasan follows the other Northern Samoyedic languages, and verbal endings attach directly to nouns and adjectives:
In sections on phonology, morphology, and syntax they consider such topics as the Avestan alphabet, the transmission, historical phonology, anaptyctic vowels, consonants, nominal inflection, case endings of the dual and plural, the adjective, prepositions and preverbs, present tense, aorist stems, personal endings, non-finite and nominal forms, case syntax, and negation.
When Galen (De locis affectis 7) tells about his collegue Archigenes treating a mbrotheis, the aorist participle is not plausible for a birth defect.
if one assumes the force of the aorist active, it seems that the
Wakefield" is an exceedingly poignant story about an unwarranted and potentially interminable aorist transaction of marital severance and separation, one that happens overwhelmingly at the expense of the wife.
The first word, molon, is the aorist active participle (masculine, nominative, singular) of the Greek verb "to come," meaning in this instance "having come.