apathy


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ap·a·thy

 (ăp′ə-thē)
n.
1. Lack of interest or concern, especially regarding matters of general importance or appeal; indifference.
2. Lack of emotion or feeling; impassiveness.

[Latin apathīa, from Greek apatheia, from apathēs, without feeling : a-, without; see a-1 + pathos, feeling; see kwent(h)- in Indo-European roots.]

apathy

(ˈæpəθɪ)
n
1. absence of interest in or enthusiasm for things generally considered interesting or moving
2. absence of emotion
[C17: from Latin, from Greek apatheia, from apathēs without feeling, from a-1 + pathos feeling]

ap•a•thy

(ˈæp ə θi)

n., pl. -thies.
1. absence or suppression of passion, emotion, or excitement.
2. lack of interest in or concern for things that others find moving or exciting.
[1595–1605; (< French) < Latin apathīa < Greek apátheia insensibility to suffering]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apathy - an absence of emotion or enthusiasmapathy - an absence of emotion or enthusiasm
feeling - the experiencing of affective and emotional states; "she had a feeling of euphoria"; "he had terrible feelings of guilt"; "I disliked him and the feeling was mutual"
emotionlessness, impassiveness, impassivity, phlegm, stolidity, unemotionality, indifference - apathy demonstrated by an absence of emotional reactions
listlessness, languor, lassitude - a feeling of lack of interest or energy
2.apathy - the trait of lacking enthusiasm for or interest in things generallyapathy - the trait of lacking enthusiasm for or interest in things generally
passivity, passiveness - the trait of remaining inactive; a lack of initiative

apathy

apathy

noun
Translations
لامُبالاه، فُتور الشُّعور
lhostejnost
apatiligegyldighed
apatia
apatija
apátia
áhugaleysi
apatijaapatiškaiapatiškas
apātijavienaldzība
apatija
apati
ilgisizlikkayıtsızlık

apathy

[ˈæpəθɪ] Napatía f, indiferencia f
apathy towards sthindiferencia hacia algo, falta f de interés en algo

apathy

[ˈæpəθi] n [person] → apathie f, indifférence f

apathy

apathy

[ˈæpəθɪ] napatia, indifferenza

apathy

(ˈӕpəθi) noun
a lack of interest or enthusiasm. his apathy towards his work.
ˌapaˈthetic (-ˈθe-) adjective
ˌapaˈthetically adverb

ap·a·thy

n. apatía, insensibilidad.

apathy

n apatía
References in classic literature ?
Being decidedly nettled herself, and longing to see him shake off the apathy that so altered him, Amy sharpened both tongue and pencil, and began.
On every side the captured were flying before their relentless persecutors, while the armed columns of the Christian king stood fast in an apathy which has never been explained, and which has left an immovable blot on the otherwise fair escutcheon of their leader.
Subsiding from it, he did not sink into his former intellectual apathy.
That is, I mean that I could not be a Christian otherwise, though I have certainly had intercourse with a great many enlightened and Christian people who did no such thing; and I confess that the apathy of religious people on this subject, their want of perception of wrongs that filled me with horror, have engendered in me more scepticism than any other thing.
She had sunk into a dreary apathy and would not be roused.
I walked a long time, and when I thought I had nearly done enough, and might conscientiously yield to the fatigue that almost overpowered me--might relax this forced action, and, sitting down on a stone I saw near, submit resistlessly to the apathy that clogged heart and limb--I heard a bell chime--a church bell.
I wish you could dismiss that apathy out of that countenance, and look rather more anxious about me.
That of the serf, or bondsman, was sad and sullen; his aspect was bent on the ground with an appearance of deep dejection, which might be almost construed into apathy, had not the fire which occasionally sparkled in his red eye manifested that there slumbered, under the appearance of sullen despondency, a sense of oppression, and a disposition to resistance.
On the other hand, I compared the disquisitions of the ancient moralists to very towering and magnificent palaces with no better foundation than sand and mud: they laud the virtues very highly, and exhibit them as estimable far above anything on earth; but they give us no adequate criterion of virtue, and frequently that which they designate with so fine a name is but apathy, or pride, or despair, or parricide.
The apathy of these poor soldiers can only be conceived by those who remember to have crossed vast deserts of snow without other perspective than a snow horizon, without other drink than snow, without other bed than snow, without other food than snow or a few frozen beet-roots, a few handfuls of flour, or a little horseflesh.
A settled apathy, a gradual wasting away of the person, and frequent although transient affections of a partially cataleptical character, were the unusual diagnosis.
I thought I would find out if his apathy were real or only assumed, and tried to lead him to talk of his pets, a theme which had never failed to excite his attention.