aperient

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Related to aperients: purgative

a·pe·ri·ent

 (ə-pîr′ē-ənt)
adj.
Gently stimulating evacuation of the bowels; laxative.
n.
A mild laxative.

[Latin aperiēns, aperient-, present participle of aperīre, to open; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

a·pe′ri·ent n.

aperient

(əˈpɪərɪənt) med
adj
(Medicine) laxative
n
(Pharmacology) Also called: aperitive a mild laxative
[C17: from Latin aperīre to open]

a•per•i•ent

(əˈpɪər i ənt)

adj.
1. having a mild purgative or laxative effect.
n.
2. a substance that acts as a mild laxative.
[1620–30; < Latin aperient-, s. of aperiēns, present participle of aperīre to open]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aperient - a purging medicine; stimulates evacuation of the bowels
aloes, bitter aloes - a purgative made from the leaves of aloe
castor oil - a purgative extracted from the seed of the castor-oil plant; used in paint and varnish as well as medically
Epsom salts - (used with a singular noun) hydrated magnesium sulfate used as a laxative
laxative - a mild cathartic
medicament, medication, medicinal drug, medicine - (medicine) something that treats or prevents or alleviates the symptoms of disease
milk of magnesia - purgative consisting of a milky white liquid suspension of magnesium hydroxide; used as a laxative and (in smaller doses) as an antacid
Rochelle powder, Seidlitz powder, Seidlitz powders - an effervescing salt containing sodium bicarbonate and Rochelle salt and tartaric acid; used as a cathartic
Adj.1.aperient - mildly laxativeaperient - mildly laxative      
laxative - stimulating evacuation of feces
Translations

aperient

[əˈpɪərɪənt]
A. ADJlaxante
B. Nlaxante m

aperient

nAbführmittel nt
adjabführend

aperient

[əˈpɪərɪənt]
1. adjlassativo/a
2. nlassativo
References in periodicals archive ?
Just over half of the patients audited (53%) had 'normal' bowel function, 32% of patients had not had a normal bowel action in the previous three days, while 15% had experienced diarrhoea with or without aperients.
Aperients were given in various forms and quantities and at different stages of the patient's admission.
From a Western botanical traditional approach, combining these bitters with herbal cholagogues, carminatives, antispasmodics, antimicrobials, anti-inflammatories, astringents, nerviness, adaptogens, antidiarrheals, and aperients (mild laxatives) can possibly address the multiplicity of IBS symptoms more effectively.