aperture synthesis


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Related to aperture synthesis: Astronomical interferometer

aperture synthesis

n
(Astronomy) an array of radio telescopes used in radio astronomy to simulate a single large-aperture telescope. Some such instruments use movable dishes while others use fixed dishes
Translations
synthèse d'ouverture
References in periodicals archive ?
But only with the advent of the techniques called radio interferometry and aperture synthesis in the 1960s did astronomers succeed in obtaining detailed "images" of the radio sky.
Modern radar systems like Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Associative Aperture Synthesis Radar (AASR) can employ inexpensive means to locate low observable targets.
Tender issueSMOS has shown the importance of achieving low level of noise floor and side lobes for best image quality in aperture synthesis radiometry.
Interferometric aperture synthesis imaging technology, initially developed for radio astronomy in the 1980s [4,5], can well solve the contradiction between the antenna aperture and spatial resolution.
Taylor, "First video rate imagery from a 32-channel 22-GHz aperture synthesis passive millimetre wave imager," Proc.
This effort was continued by experimenting coherent radar with non-focused aperture synthesis methods and produced the first SAR image in July 1953 [5].
Here, the aperture synthesis with a cosecant pattern was realized in the E-plane.
Baldwin of the University of Cambridge and his colleagues used the combination telescope, known as COAST (Cambridge Optical Aperture Synthesis Telescope), to examine Capella, a double star system 40 light-years away.
Hewish collects the Nobel Prize for Physics eight years later, sharing it with Sir Martin Ryle, Astronomer Royal, whose technique of aperture synthesis had made many of the observations possible.
Interferometric aperture synthesis, initially developed for radio astronomy [4], can be an effective alternative to real aperture radiometers for the Earth observation.
But Martin Ryle, a British astronomer at the University of Cambridge, developed a technique called aperture synthesis that takes advantage of what happens when radio waves interfere with each other.
Antenna aperture synthesis was first introduced radio astronomy.