aphasia


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a·pha·sia

 (ə-fā′zhə)
n.
Partial or total loss of the ability to articulate ideas or comprehend spoken or written language, resulting from damage to the brain from injury or disease.

[Greek, from aphatos, speechless : a-, not; see a-1 + phatos, spoken, speakable (from phanai, to speak; see -phasia).]

a·pha′si·ac′ (-zē-ăk′) n.
a·pha′sic (-zĭk, -sĭk) adj. & n.

aphasia

(əˈfeɪzɪə)
n
(Pathology) a disorder of the central nervous system characterized by partial or total loss of the ability to communicate, esp in speech or writing. Compare alexia
[C19: via New Latin from Greek, from a-1 + -phasia, from phanai to speak]
aˈphasiˌac, aˈphasic adj, n

a•pha•sia

(əˈfeɪ ʒə)

n.
the loss of a previously held ability to speak or understand spoken or written language, due to disease or injury of the brain.
[1865–70; < Greek: speechlessness =a- a-6 + phat(ós) spoken, v. adj. of phánai to speak + -ia -ia]
a•pha′sic, adj., n.

aphasia

Pathology. an impairment or loss of the faculty of understanding or using spoken or written language. — aphasiac, n. — aphasic, n., adj.
See also: Speech
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aphasia - inability to use or understand language (spoken or written) because of a brain lesionaphasia - inability to use or understand language (spoken or written) because of a brain lesion
brain disease, brain disorder, encephalopathy - any disorder or disease of the brain
acoustic aphasia, auditory aphasia, word deafness - an impairment in understanding spoken language that is not attributable to hearing loss
associative aphasia, conduction aphasia - aphasia in which the lesion is assumed to be in the association tracts connecting the various language centers in the brain; patient's have difficulty repeating a sentence just heard
global aphasia, total aphasia - loss of all ability to communicate
ataxic aphasia, Broca's aphasia, expressive aphasia, motor aphasia, nonfluent aphasia - aphasia in which expression by speech or writing is severely impaired
amnesic aphasia, amnestic aphasia, anomia, anomic aphasia, nominal aphasia - inability to name objects or to recognize written or spoken names of objects
transcortical aphasia - a general term for aphasia that results from lesions outside of Broca's area or Wernicke's area of the cerebral cortex
alexia, visual aphasia, word blindness - inability to perceive written words
fluent aphasia, impressive aphasia, receptive aphasia, sensory aphasia, Wernicke's aphasia - aphasia characterized by fluent but meaningless speech and severe impairment of the ability understand spoken or written words
Translations
afasi
afasia
málstol
afasi

aphasia

[æˈfeɪzɪə] Nafasia f

aphasia

[əˈfeɪziə] (MEDICINE) naphasie f

aphasia

nAphasie f

a·pha·si·a

n. afasia, incapacidad de coordinar el pensamiento y la palabra;
amnestic ______ amnéstica;
ataxic ______ atáxica.

aphasia

n afasia, dificultad f para entender o para expresarse debida a una lesión del cerebro; expressive — afasia expresiva; receptive — afasia receptiva
References in periodicals archive ?
Recently, the concurrence of aphasia and nonlinguistic cognitive deficits, such as attention, memory, and visuospatial functions, has been confirmed in many studies.
This stand-alone textbook is for a course in aphasia and other neurogenic communication disorders at the undergraduate or graduate level.
Aphasia can be so severe as to make communication with the patient almost impossible, or it can be very mild.
Aphasia is caused by damage to brain regions that are responsible for speaking and language comprehension.
1 The most common cause of aphasia is Cardio Vascular Accident, i.
If you've caravan it passing Aphasia affects a person's ability to speak, read, write and understand, but not their intelligence.
Aphasia is caused by damage to parts of the brain responsible for understanding and using language.
There is an increasing need to develop new interventions that enhance the recovery from chronic aphasia after a stroke.
In support of the need to improve the quality of life of patients with aphasia in the long term, an intervention program called Aphasia Action Success Knowledge (Aphasia ASK) has been developed.
It is a problem with language, not intelligence (National Aphasia Association, 2015).
2010) reported that 62% to 70% of individuals with aphasia experience depression and profound psychosocial losses.