aphorism


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aph·o·rism

 (ăf′ə-rĭz′əm)
n.
1. A tersely phrased statement of a truth or opinion; an adage. See Synonyms at saying.
2. A brief statement of a scientific principle.

[French aphorisme, from Old French, from Late Latin aphorismus, from Greek aphorismos, from aphorizein, to delimit, define : apo-, apo- + horizein, to delimit, define; see horizon.]

aph′o·rist n.
aph′o·ris′tic (-rĭs′tĭk) adj.
aph′o·ris′ti·cal·ly adv.

aphorism

(ˈæfəˌrɪzəm)
n
a short pithy saying expressing a general truth; maxim
[C16: from Late Latin aphorismus, from Greek aphorismos definition, from aphorizein to define, set limits to, from horos boundary]
ˈaphorist n

aph•o•rism

(ˈæf əˌrɪz əm)

n.
a terse saying embodying a general truth or astute observation, as “Art is long, life is short.”
[1520–30; French aphorisme < Late Latin aphorismus < Greek aphorismós definition =aphor(ízein) to define + -ismos -ism]
aph′o•rist, n.

aphorism

a terse saying embodying a general truth, as “Time flies.” — aphorist, n. — aphorismic, aphorismical, aphoristic, adj.
See also: Proverbs

aphorism

A brief, witty statement of a general truth.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aphorism - a short pithy instructive saying
axiom, maxim - a saying that is widely accepted on its own merits

aphorism

noun saying, maxim, gnome, adage, proverb, dictum, precept, axiom, apothegm, saw one of his favoured aphorisms

aphorism

noun
A usually pithy and familiar statement expressing an observation or principle generally accepted as wise or true:
Translations
aforisme
aforismusaforizmus
aforisme
aforizam

aphorism

[ˈæfərɪzəm] Naforismo m

aphorism

[ˈæfərɪzəm] n (= witticism) → aphorisme m

aphorism

nAphorismus m

aphorism

[ˈæfərɪzm] naforisma m
References in classic literature ?
Altogether, the Old Bailey, at that date, was a choice illustration of the precept, that "Whatever is is right;" an aphorism that would be as final as it is lazy, did it not include the troublesome consequence, that nothing that ever was, was wrong.
No doubt it was in further elaboration of this aphorism that the little steamboat that sailed every other day from Yellowsands to the beckoning shores of France was called "the Mayflower.
Every now and then, having learned from Newman that he had been through the museums of Europe, he uttered some polished aphorism upon the flesh-tints of Rubens and the good taste of Sansovino.
That he who hesitates is lost proved itself a true aphorism in this instance, for another moment saw me creeping stealthily toward the door of the guard-house.
It was at this time, and under these circumstances, that I framed an aphorism which has already become celebrated.
As I have told you my own aphorism I feel I ought in fairness to record that of this aggrieved servant.
He belonged to that natural, humorous school who took for their motto in the seventeenth century the aphorism uttered by one of their number in 1653, -- "To despise flowers is to offend God.
And sometime under the liquor drug, snatches of wisdom came to him far more lucidity than in his sober moments, as, for instance, one night, when he sat on the edge of the bed with one shoe in his hand and meditated on Dede's aphorism to the effect that he could not sleep in more than one bed at a time.
In this Spain of ours there is a proverb, to my mind very true- as they all are, being short aphorisms drawn from long practical experience- and the one I refer to says, 'The church, or the sea, or the king's house;' as much as to say, in plainer language, whoever wants to flourish and become rich, let him follow the church, or go to sea, adopting commerce as his calling, or go into the king's service in his household, for they say,
Here is a better recognition of popular rights, than volumes of those aphorisms which make the principal figure in several of our State bills of rights, and which would sound much better in a treatise of ethics than in a constitution of government.
I have been taught these two aphorisms in Latin and in Greek; one is, I believe, from Phaedrus, and the other from Bias.
Mulcachy had originated aphorisms of his own which he continually enunciated, among which were: