apoliticism


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apoliticism

(ˌeɪpəˈlɪtɪsɪzəm) or

apoliticality

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the quality of being apolitical
References in periodicals archive ?
The churches that emerged from the Protestant missions inherited an apoliticism that prevented them from clearly appreciating their role in the processes of democratization and social change that nevertheless took place in the decades that followed.
The office's number-crunching abilities are respected precisely because of its strict adherence to apoliticism.
Salafism in Lebanon: From Apoliticism to Transnational Jihadism, Georgetown University Press, Washington d.
However, if this apoliticism applies to the human youth subcultures that form the backdrop for the action in Clare's and Marr's books, these texts are concerned precisely with the political machinations of the supernatural realm into which their girl protagonists are drawn.
The debate, which took place as the Vietnam War was escalating and antiwar poetry was prevalent, originated with an article by Ashbery published in Book Week in September 1966 defending the perceived apoliticism of his recently deceased friend Frank O'Hara: (1)
5) Moreover, in sharp contrast to Marshall's studied apoliticism, the officer corps of the military now largely identifies with the Republican party; therefore, the president's party affiliation cannot but affect the health of the civil-military relationship.
In the 1927 editorial "First Aid to the Enemy," Jolas, Paul, and contributing editor Robert Sage made a well-known statement of apoliticism for the magazine: "All forms of politics are outside the range of our interests" (1927, 175).
Today, there are three distinct schools of thought among Salafists in Lebanon, according to Robert Rabil, a professor at Florida Atlantic University and author of the recently published book "Salafism in Lebanon: From Apoliticism to Transnational Jihadism.
The party spanned generations and drew support from a naturalised apoliticism that was embedded in a range of social events - typically dining clubs for men and card games for women.
He uses excerpts from these interviews to document their life stories and previous contact with social workers; their age on entry to social work education, the presence of men in the field, student experiences with racism, and their personality, apoliticism, age, gender, race, and suitability for the field; whether some students should not become social workers; their views on instruction, including assignments, theories and methods, skills, and teachers; and their practice and placement experiences.
For a useful review of studies highlighting evangelical apoliticism in these years, see Wuthnow (1983, 168-72).