apophatic


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Related to apophatic: cataphatic

apophatic

(ˌæpəˈfætɪk)
adj
of or relating to the belief that God can only be described by a process of negation
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.apophatic - of or relating to the belief that God can be known to humans only in terms of what He is not (such as `God is unknowable')
Translations
apophatisch
References in periodicals archive ?
Applying the Murphy-MacIntyrean framework, and within the tenets of relational and apophatic spirituality, Part 3 outlines three conceptual domains that describe the telos, problem, and process of this moral quest.
It is possible that Ashbery intends to leave an opening for apophatic (negative) theology.
For those who may still feel Sturtevant seems to require an apophatic approach, in that, like God, she can only be defined by negative attributes, let's be quick: The work isn't copy because it has never been about her setting up an easel in front of a "masterpiece" and copying stroke by stroke, beholden, derivative.
Influenced by the mystics, Beissel developed a form of apophatic thought centered on the via negativa.
Relationship with God in Western religious traditions has manifested historically in two major pathways: the cataphatic and the apophatic (Cronk, 1991).
The Sacred Fount, in trying to hold open a space for the unspeakable, uses textual strategies similar to those developed by apophatic mystics to speak about God.
a] Garijo-Guembe on the role the recognition of the complementarity of traditions might play in Orthodox-Catholic dialogue, and a remarkable piece by Gorazd Kocijancic on the relevance to post-modernism of the Eastern apophatic tradition.
Among their topics are Kierkegaard as a four-dimensional thinker, Kierkegaard and the Epistle of James, Kierkegaard and apostolic authority, the apophatic self and the way of forgetting, the rule of chaos and the perturbation of love, and Kierkegaard and the peaceable kingdom.
His argument begins by setting out a theological framework which engages with apophatic, or negative, theology where God can only be described by what God is not provocatively put by the 9th-century mystic John the Scot Eriugena: 'God Himself does not know what He is because He is not anything.
Many reject an anthropological concept of god, as it would be simply a projection of an upper-case version of humanity But Maguire is dismissive of any concept of a god altogether, even of an apophatic nature.
There is no possibility for this total theology apart from prayer, particularly in the apophatic mode.
He argues that apophatic pluralism, in contradistinction to cataphatic religious truth, is the future of religion.