apoplexy


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Related to apoplexy: consumption, Pituitary apoplexy

ap·o·plex·y

 (ăp′ə-plĕk′sē)
n.
1. Sudden impairment of neurological function, especially that resulting from a cerebral hemorrhage; a stroke.
2. A sudden effusion of blood into an organ or tissue.
3. A fit of extreme anger; rage: "The proud ... members suffered collective apoplexy, and this year they are out for blood" (David Finch).

[Middle English apoplexie, from Old French, from Late Latin apoplēxia, from Greek apoplēxiā, from apoplēssein, apoplēg-, to cripple by a stroke : apo-, intensive pref.; see apo- + plēssein, to strike; see plāk- in Indo-European roots.]

apoplexy

(ˈæpəˌplɛksɪ)
n
(Pathology) sudden loss of consciousness, often followed by paralysis, caused by rupture or occlusion of a blood vessel in the brain
[C14: from Old French apoplexie, from Late Latin apoplēxia, from Greek: from apoplēssein to cripple by a stroke, from plēssein to strike]

ap•o•plex•y

(ˈæp əˌplɛk si)

n.
2. a sudden, usu. marked, loss of bodily function due to rupture or occlusion of a blood vessel.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin apoplexia < Greek]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apoplexy - a sudden loss of consciousness resulting when the rupture or occlusion of a blood vessel leads to oxygen lack in the brainapoplexy - a sudden loss of consciousness resulting when the rupture or occlusion of a blood vessel leads to oxygen lack in the brain
attack - a sudden occurrence of an uncontrollable condition; "an attack of diarrhea"
ischaemic stroke, ischemic stroke - the most common kind of stroke; caused by an interruption in the flow of blood to the brain (as from a clot blocking a blood vessel)
haemorrhagic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke - stroke caused by the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain
cerebral hemorrhage - bleeding from a ruptured blood vessel in the brain

apoplexy

noun
1. fit, attack, heart attack, seizure, convulsion, paroxysm In 1685, Charles II died of apoplexy.
2. anger, rage, outrage, fury, indignation, ire, antagonism, exasperation, vexation He has caused apoplexy with his books on class and war.
Translations

apoplexy

[ˈæpəpleksɪ] N
1. (Med) (o.f.) → apoplejía f
2. (= rage) → cólera f, ira f

apoplexy

[ˈæpəplɛksi] n (MEDICINE)apoplexie f

apoplexy

nApoplexie f (spec), → Schlaganfall m

apoplexy

[ˈæpəplɛksɪ] napoplessia

ap·o·plexy

n. apoplejía, hemorragia cerebral.
References in classic literature ?
One,--John Swinnerton by name,--who appears to have been a man of eminence, upheld it, if we have rightly understood his terms of art, to be a case of apoplexy.
The word SCHLAG means Blow, Stroke, Dash, Hit, Shock, Clap, Slap, Time, Bar, Coin, Stamp, Kind, Sort, Manner, Way, Apoplexy, Wood-cutting, Enclosure, Field, Forest-clearing.
Nineteen months afterward his widow died of apoplexy at a boarding-house in Cheltenham.
Raveloe lay low among the bushy trees and the rutted lanes, aloof from the currents of industrial energy and Puritan earnestness: the rich ate and drank freely, accepting gout and apoplexy as things that ran mysteriously in respectable families, and the poor thought that the rich were entirely in the right of it to lead a jolly life; besides, their feasting caused a multiplication of orts, which were the heirlooms of the poor.
The captain had been struck dead by thundering apoplexy.
One dark winter night - it had struck nine some time before the landlord joined us - there was a sick man in the George, a great neighbouring proprietor suddenly struck down with apoplexy on his way to Parliament; and the great man's still greater London doctor had been telegraphed to his bedside.
The effect of the present revelation was stunning; he trembled and was on the verge of apoplexy.
Grant had brought on apoplexy and death, by three great institutionary dinners in one week, they still lived together; for Mary, though perfectly resolved against ever attaching herself to a younger brother again, was long in finding among the dashing representatives, or idle heir-apparents, who were at the command of her beauty, and her 20,000, any one who could satisfy the better taste she had acquired at Mansfield, whose character and manners could authorise a hope of the domestic happiness she had there learned to estimate, or put Edmund Bertram sufficiently out of her head.
He held on to the edge of apoplexy, then collapsed, throwing the umbrella from him.
He eats five times a day, and lances boils for my hinds to save himself from an apoplexy.
Let's only hope it would give him an apoplexy," said I shuddering.
Gordon was dead, he had died of apoplexy two years before, but all the rest were there.