aporia


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a·po·ri·a

 (ə-pôr′ē-ə)
n.
1. A figure of speech in which the speaker expresses or purports to be in doubt about a question.
2. An insoluble contradiction or paradox in a text's meanings.

[Greek aporiā, difficulty of passing, from aporos, impassable : a-, without; see a-1 + poros, passage; see per- in Indo-European roots.]

aporia

(əˈpɔːrɪə)
n
1. (Rhetoric) rhetoric a doubt, real or professed, about what to do or say
2. (Philosophy) philosophy puzzlement occasioned by the raising of philosophical objections without any proffered solutions, esp in the works of Socrates
[C16: from Greek, literally: a state of being at a loss]
aporetic adj

aporia

The expression of doubt about what to say or do.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mellor's distinction between A-series and B-series categories of time, but there is no discussion of the aporia of time as such in Stephen Menn's essay on Augustine's aporetic method, the longest and best contribution in the volume, even though Menn does, at least tangentially and in passing, deal with memory.
To Socrates, aporia has a purgative effect since it instills a quest for knowledge in the seeker of the answer.
In Derrida's conceptualization, there is an aporia between conditional hospitality that welcomes the Other within the limits of the law, and unconditional hospitality, which is the ethics of hospitality and therefore infinite and unlimited.
Symptomatic, however, of a collective aporia, Cities in Translation does not include the Aboriginal language communities whose audibility has not yet escaped marginalization in Montreal.
Hence the feeling of aporia, the paradoxical non-road we must cross.
For Clute and Edwards, The Avant-Garde Finds Andy Hardy is a symptom of the current aporia of noir studies: "the more one reads of noir scholarship, the more one has the impression everyone has been trying to understand noir constraint in an oulipian sense, but often without the prerequisite knowledge of the Oulipo to make their positions explicit" (italics mine, 35).
While we should assume, at the very least, that the novel represents a free and revisionist honing, Jacksons use of aporia and contradiction allows him to harness the emotional power of the diary.
provides exhaustive attention to the history of the study and details of each aporia (1:10-12).
For the emigre musician who remained committed to the reform of musital theater in his adopted homeland, it represented neither an impasse nor an aporia, but a viable set of possibilities" (p.
At tamen, eadem fides et novae spes quibus progenitores nostri pugnabant per totum orbem in aporia sunt, credentes iura hominis non rei publicae e largitione venire, at e manibus Dei.
Knapp's discussion of the former centers on the "visual aporia at the heart of ethical judgment: that it is never possible to see with another's eyes" (100).
It is hard to read this book without drowning in it, because Farrier is so fervent in devising a political phenomenology to expose the aporia of legal sovereignty.