apostrophe


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a·pos·tro·phe 1

 (ə-pŏs′trə-fē)
n.
The superscript sign ( ' ), usually used to indicate the omission of a letter or letters from a word, the possessive case, or the plurals of numbers, letters, and abbreviations.

[French, from Late Latin apostrophus, from Greek apostrophos, from apostrephein, to turn away : apo-, apo- + strephein, to turn; see streb(h)- in Indo-European roots.]

ap′os·troph′ic (ăp′ə-strŏf′ĭk) adj.

a·pos·tro·phe 2

 (ə-pŏs′trə-fē)
n.
The direct address of an absent or imaginary person or of a personified abstraction, especially as a digression in the course of a speech or composition.

[Late Latin apostrophē, from Greek, from apostrephein, to turn away; see apostrophe1.]

ap′os·troph′ic (ăp′ə-strŏf′ĭk) adj.

apostrophe

(əˈpɒstrəfɪ)
n
the punctuation mark ' used to indicate the omission of a letter or number, such as he's for he has or he is, also used in English to form the possessive, as in John's father and twenty pounds' worth
[C17: from Late Latin, from Greek apostrophos mark of elision, from apostrephein to turn away]

apostrophe

(əˈpɒstrəfɪ)
n
(Rhetoric) rhetoric a digression from a discourse, esp an address to an imaginary or absent person or a personification
[C16: from Latin apostrophē, from Greek: a turning away, digression]
apostrophic adj

a•pos•tro•phe1

(əˈpɒs trə fi)

n.
the sign ('), as used: to indicate the omission of one or more letters in a word, whether unpronounced, as in o'er for over, or pronounced, as in gov't for government; to indicate the possessive case, as in woman's; or to indicate plurals of abbreviations and symbols, as in several M.D.'s, 3's.
[1580–90; < Middle French < Late Latin apostrophus < Greek apóstrophos (prosōidía) eliding (mark), <apostréphein to turn away = apo- + stréphein to turn; see strophe]
ap•os•troph•ic (ˌæp əˈstrɒf ɪk) adj.

a•pos•tro•phe2

(əˈpɒs trə fi)

n.
a digression in the form of an address to someone not present, or to a personified object or idea.
[1525–35; < Late Latin < Greek apostrophḗ a turning away, n. derivative of apostréphein; see apostrophe1]
ap•os•troph•ic (ˌæp əˈstrɒf ɪk) adj.

apostrophe

a variety of personification in which the dead, absent, or inanimate are addressed as if present. — apostrophic, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

apostrophe

1. A punctuation mark (’) used to show that a letter has been omitted or to indicate possession, such as in “David’s house.”
2. The act of addressing a person or object, whether present or not, while in the middle of a discourse.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apostrophe - address to an absent or imaginary person
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)
2.apostrophe - the mark (') used to indicate the omission of one or more letters from a printed wordapostrophe - the mark (') used to indicate the omission of one or more letters from a printed word
punctuation mark, punctuation - the marks used to clarify meaning by indicating separation of words into sentences and clauses and phrases
Translations
апостроф
apostrof
apostrof
heittomerkkiapostrofi
apostrofapostrofaizostavnik
aposztróf
apostrophe
úrfellingarmerki
アポストロフィ
아포스트로피
apostrofa
apostrofs
apostrof
apostrof
apostrofopuščaj
apostrof
เครื่องหมายวรรคตอน
dấu móc lửng

apostrophe

[əˈpɒstrəfɪ] N
1. (Ling) → apóstrofo m
2. (= address) → apóstrofe m

apostrophe

[əˈpɒstrəfi] napostrophe f

apostrophe

n
(Gram) → Apostroph m
(Liter) → Apostrophe f

apostrophe

[əˈpɒstrəfɪ] n (Gram) (sign) → apostrofo

apostrophe

(əˈpostrəfi) noun
a mark (') which is used to show that a letter or letters has/have been omitted from a word, and which is also used in possessive phrases and in the plurals of letters. the boy's coat; the boys' coats; There are two n's in `cannot' but only one in `can't'.

apostrophe

عَلامَة تُدِلُّ عَلَى حَذْف حَرْف apostrof apostrof Apostroph απόστροφος apóstrofe, apóstrofo heittomerkki apostrophe apostrof apostrofo アポストロフィ 아포스트로피 apostrof apostrof apostrof apóstrofo апостроф apostrof เครื่องหมายวรรคตอน kesme imi dấu móc lửng 撇号
References in classic literature ?
She made no reply to this apostrophe to the night, which, indeed, was not addressed to her.
My thoughts would compel utter- ance; and there, with no audience but the Almighty, I would pour out my soul's complaint, in my rude way, with an apostrophe to the moving multitude of ships:--
Cruncher, varying his apostrophe after missing his mark--"what are you up to, Aggerawayter?
He then explained this affectionate apostrophe, by touching his brooch representing the lady and the weeping willow at the tomb with the urn upon it, and saying, "Had it made for me, express
He almost forgot Trefusis as he added the apostrophe.
reiterated Crimsworth; and to complete his apostrophe, he cracked the whip straight over my head.
He has met with great kindness from the chaplain of the Antwerp," was a tender apostrophe of Fanny's, very much to the purpose of her own feelings if not of the conversation.
If his deafness did happen to betray him here and there, by some incoherent apostrophe or some unintelligible question, it passed for profundity with some, and for imbecility with others.
During this apostrophe - half serious, half ironical - Athos and Raoul preserved the coolest, most unconcerned silence.
Honoured sir," a little put out by this apostrophe, "I do not say that I am coming to claim the tulip of Master Boxtel, but to reclaim my own.
The cat starts--not at his mistress's complimentary apostrophe, but at a knock at the door, which follows close upon it.
In the energy of these sentiments, which were uttered as an apostrophe to the Heavens in general, Miss Miggs perched the bonnet on the top of her own head, and folding her hands, turned on her tears.