appellation


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ap·pel·la·tion

 (ăp′ə-lā′shən)
n.
1. A name, title, or designation.
2. A protected name under which a wine may be sold, indicating that the grapes used are of a specific kind from a specific district.
3. The act of naming.

[Middle English appelacion, from Old French appelation, from Latin appellātiō, appellātiōn-, from appellātus, past participle of appellāre, to entreat; see appeal. Sense 2, from French appellation (d'origine contrôlée), (registered vintage) trade name, from appellation, trade name, from Old French appelation.]

appellation

(ˌæpɪˈleɪʃən)
n
1. an identifying name or title
2. the act of naming or giving a title to

ap•pel•la•tion

(ˌæp əˈleɪ ʃən)

n.
an identifying name, title, or designation.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Old French < Latin appellātiō]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.appellation - identifying word or words by which someone or something is called and classified or distinguished from othersappellation - identifying word or words by which someone or something is called and classified or distinguished from others
name - a language unit by which a person or thing is known; "his name really is George Washington"; "those are two names for the same thing"
street name - an alternative name that a person chooses or is given (especially in inner city neighborhoods); "her street name is Bonbon"
byname, cognomen, moniker, nickname, sobriquet, soubriquet - a familiar name for a person (often a shortened version of a person's given name); "Joe's mother would not use his nickname and always called him Joseph"; "Henry's nickname was Slim"
form of address, title of respect, title - an identifying appellation signifying status or function: e.g. `Mr.' or `General'; "the professor didn't like his friends to use his formal title"
title - an appellation signifying nobility; "`your majesty' is the appropriate title to use in addressing a king"

appellation

noun (Formal) name, term, style, title, address, description, designation, epithet, sobriquet They called him the King of Pork. He never minded the appellation.

appellation

noun
The word or words by which one is called and identified:
Slang: handle, moniker.
Translations

appellation

[ˌæpeˈleɪʃən] N (= name) → nombre m; (= title) → título m; [of wine] → denominación f de origen

appellation

nBezeichnung f, → Benennung f
References in classic literature ?
The name has appeared to find favor, and all things considered, it may possibly be quite as well to let it stand, instead of going back to the House of Hanover for the appellation of our finest sheet of water.
Pyncheon Street formerly bore the humbler appellation of Maule's Lane, from the name of the original occupant of the soil, before whose cottage-door it was a cow-path.
Under the appellation of Roger Chillingworth, the reader will remember, was hidden another name, which its former wearer had resolved should never more be spoken.
And so the appellation must at last have come to be bestowed upon the whale from which this spermaceti was really derived.
It is called slobgollion; an appellation original with the whalemen, and even so is the nature of the substance.
How can she find any appellation for them, deep enough in familiar vulgarity?
I did not know whether to resent this language or pursue my explanation; but he seemed so powerfully affected that I took pity and proceeded with my dreams; affirming I had never heard the appellation of 'Catherine Linton' before, but reading it often over produced an impression which personified itself when I had no longer my imagination under control.
His surname was Cruncher, and on the youthful occasion of his renouncing by proxy the works of darkness, in the easterly parish church of Hounsditch, he had received the added appellation of Jerry.
said my aunt, as a compromise for the obnoxious appellation.
I said, "I had not;" and desired he would explain to me "what he meant by such an appellation, applied to a mortal creature.
There are few things upon which a greater variety of conjectures has been offered than upon the reasons that induced the ancients to distinguish this gulf, which separates Asia from Africa, by the name of the Red Sea, an appellation that has almost universally obtained in all languages.
Poland, which is a mixture of aristocracy and of monarchy in their worst forms, has been dignified with the same appellation.