appellative


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ap·pel·la·tive

 (ə-pĕl′ə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the assignment of names.
2. Grammar Of or relating to a common noun.
n.
A name or descriptive epithet.

[Middle English, common (noun), from Old French appelatif, from Late Latin appelātīvus, from Latin appellātus, past participle of appellāre, to call upon, entreat; see appeal.]

ap·pel′la·tive·ly adv.

appellative

(əˈpɛlətɪv)
n
1. an identifying name or title; appellation
2. (Grammar) grammar another word for common noun
adj
3. of or relating to a name or title
4. (Grammar) (of a proper noun) used as a common noun
apˈpellatively adv

ap•pel•la•tive

(əˈpɛl ə tɪv)

n. adj.
3. tending toward or serving for the assigning of names: the appellative function of some primitive rites.
4. of or pertaining to a common noun.
[1375–1425; late Middle English (< Middle French) < Late Latin]
ap•pel′la•tive•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.appellative - identifying word or words by which someone or something is called and classified or distinguished from othersappellative - identifying word or words by which someone or something is called and classified or distinguished from others
name - a language unit by which a person or thing is known; "his name really is George Washington"; "those are two names for the same thing"
street name - an alternative name that a person chooses or is given (especially in inner city neighborhoods); "her street name is Bonbon"
byname, cognomen, moniker, nickname, sobriquet, soubriquet - a familiar name for a person (often a shortened version of a person's given name); "Joe's mother would not use his nickname and always called him Joseph"; "Henry's nickname was Slim"
form of address, title of respect, title - an identifying appellation signifying status or function: e.g. `Mr.' or `General'; "the professor didn't like his friends to use his formal title"
title - an appellation signifying nobility; "`your majesty' is the appropriate title to use in addressing a king"
Adj.1.appellative - pertaining to or dealing with or used as a common noun
2.appellative - inclined to or serving for the giving of names; "the appellative faculty of children"; "the appellative function of some primitive rites"
denotative, denotive - having the power of explicitly denoting or designating or naming

appellative

noun
The word or words by which one is called and identified:
Slang: handle, moniker.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
But at this question, Queequeg, who had twice or thrice before taken part in similar ceremonies, looked no ways abashed; but taking the offered pen, copied upon the paper, in the proper place, an exact counterpart of a queer round figure which was tattooed upon his arm; so that through Captain Peleg's obstinate mistake touching his appellative, it stood something like this: -- Quohog his mark.
Old Marmaduke, for this formidable prenomen was a kind of appellative to the race, brought with him, to that asylum of the persecuted an abundance of the good things of this life.
In connection with this appellative of "Whalebone whales," it is of great importance to mention, that however such a nomenclature may be convenient in facilitating allusions to some kind of whales, yet it is in vain to attempt a clear classification of the Leviathan, founded upon either his baleen, or hump, or fin, or teeth; notwithstanding that those marked parts or features very obviously seem better adapted to afford the basis for a regular system of Cetology than any other detached bodily distinctions, which the whale, in his kinds, presents.
Recognizing this, Raz offers the reader several appellative lenses through which to engage her own political, gender and idea-driven poems.
apostrophes, appellative moves, perlocutionary effects, dialogical
The unrecorded appellative can be inferred from the name of a character in the MLG version of Reynard the Fox called Moneke whose name denotes 'monkey' because his father was Martin the Ape.
This requires us to develop a terminology that is classificatory ("con postmodern") rather than appellative ("like Auden").
Nelson Mandela and Mahatma Ghandi likewise deserve the appellative.
Despite the obstacles presented by Aunt Fortune, Ellen's respect for and willingness to serve others mark her development toward becoming a feeder-nurturer and earn for her the appellative of sweet food.
The steady state appellative is a misnomer in this case, as loss of underlying shell will continue apace.
Buridan usually makes the distinction in terms of talking about absolute versus appellative terms.