appetible

appetible

(ˈæpətɪbəl)
adj
obsolete desirable or capable of arousing desire
References in periodicals archive ?
This appetible is an object, either imaginary or real, currently apprehended by one of the internal senses (e.
doe first arise in the appetible or concupiscible parte.
In this case, goodness--understood, it should be noted, specifically as an appetible object rather than as, say, the predicate of a moral action--is necessarily self-referential.
According to these second and third ways, the Devil or man can incite to sin either by offering an appetible object to the senses or by persuading the reason.
The appetible object moves the appetitive power to have an intention toward the object.
Now recall that the degree to which the will is determined by the intellect is directly proportionate to the nature of the appetible object.
According to Gallagher, Thomas must believe that the will is able to control how the intellect considers the appetible object.
Given his motivation to defend Aquinas from the charge of cognitive determinism, Gallagher is obliged ultimately to ascribe to Aquinas not only that the will can control or influence how the intellect evaluates or considers appetible objects but also that it can do so autonomously.
That is, when the appetible object is good from all points of view (sub omni ratione boni), as is the case with happiness, the will is necessitated (necessitatur) to choose it since the intellect can only present it to the will under a desirable description.
This is due to the fact that it can control how the intellect considers appetible objects, a notion that bears a striking resemblance to Giles's own theory.
Perhaps the central difference between Giles's and Thomas's accounts is that for the latter, the act of specificatio really does mean that the intellect has evaluated the appetible object through a process of deliberation and determined it to be good or bad.
It is a flaw in the will of the sinner that makes possible the motion of his sense appetite toward an appetible, yet wrongful, object.