appetite suppressants


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appetite suppressants

These are occasionally used to treat obesity. Most are potentially addictive and are therefore rarely administered.
References in periodicals archive ?
A CLINIC which helps people achieve their weight loss goals through appetite suppressants has unveiled its new premises.
Foods like jerky or nuts that are high in protein are appealing as appetite suppressants and energy boosters between meals.
According to the company, the site offers all kinds of weight loss supplements from fat burners to appetite suppressants.
According to the company, these powerful appetite suppressants satisfy food craving and aid weight loss by helping people feel full between meals.
He describes the major sources of oils and fats; processing, including extraction, refining, and modification; analytical parameters; physical properties; Chemical Properties; nutritional properties; and major uses of oils and fats including as spreads, frying oils and fats, salad oils, chocolate, ice cream, and, ironically, appetite suppressants.
READY meals and snacks could soon contain appetite suppressants to help prevent weight gain.
Evidently, tests for appetite suppressants and illegal drugs would not have yielded great enough specificity in that population.
Drugs that have been associated with unintentional weight loss include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as Paxil, Prozac, and Celexa; cardiac agents such as Lasix, Lanoxin, and Vascor; amphetamines; appetite suppressants such as Adderall, Dexedrine, Cylert, Meridia, and Ritalin; and benzodiazepines such as Ativan and Klonopin.
Prescription and over-the-counter appetite suppressants are facing fierce competition from alternative weight loss techniques based on low-carbohydrate foods and beverages and bariatric surgery.
The appetite suppressants work on neurotransmitters--and we have some preliminary evidence of neurotransmitter dysfunction in eating disorders," explained Dr.
Approximately 100,000 people in Europe and the United States are afflicted with either primary pulmonary arterial hypertension or secondary forms of the disease related to conditions or tissue disorders that affect the lungs, such as scleroderma, lupus, HIV/AIDS, congenital heart disease or the use of certain appetite suppressants.
In addition, many common medicines--blood pressure drugs, antihistamines, antidepressants, tranquilizers, appetite suppressants, and cimetidine (an ulcer drug)--can produce ED as a side effect.