apples


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Related to apples: Apple store, Apple varieties

apples

(ˈæpəlz)
pl n
2. she's apples informal Austral and NZ all is going well
References in classic literature ?
answered a husky voice from above, and, running up, Meg found her sister eating apples and crying over the Heir of Redclyffe, wrapped up in a comforter on an old three-legged sofa by the sunny window.
It is delicious, like the twisted little apples that grow in the or- chards of Winesburg.
The orchard seemed full of sun, like a cup, and we could smell the ripe apples on the trees.
A curious eye, privileged to take an account of stock and investigate behind the counter, would have discovered a barrel, yea, two or three barrels and half ditto,--one containing flour, another apples, and a third, perhaps, Indian meal.
Another of his sources of fearful pleasure was to pass long winter evenings with the old Dutch wives, as they sat spinning by the fire, with a row of apples roasting and spluttering along the hearth, and listen to their marvellous tales of ghosts and goblins, and haunted fields, and haunted brooks, and haunted bridges, and haunted houses, and particularly of the headless horseman, or Galloping Hessian of the Hollow, as they sometimes called him.
So let us cheer up, and have a run to the other end of the orchard; I believe the wind has blown down some apples, and we might just as well eat them as the slugs.
The "woman" was more tractable, and for a dime Jurgis secured two thick sandwiches and a piece of pie and two apples.
In her little bundle she had provided a store of cakes and apples, which she used as expedients for quickening the speed of the child, rolling the apple some yards before them, when the boy would run with all his might after it; and this ruse, often repeated, carried them over many a half-mile.
On the table in the middle of the room was a kind of a lovely crockery basket that bad apples and oranges and peaches and grapes piled up in it, which was much redder and yellower and prettier than real ones is, but they warn't real because you could see where pieces had got chipped off and showed the white chalk, or whatever it was, under- neath.
In summer the pet pastime of the boys of Dawson's Landing was to steal apples, peaches, and melons from the farmer's fruit wagons-- mainly on account of the risk they ran of getting their heads laid open with the butt of the farmer's whip.
It is going to be a good year for apples and hay so you and John will be glad and we can pay a little more morgage.
And when I brought out the baked apples from the closet, and hoped our friends would be so very obliging as to take some, `Oh