apprenticeship


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ap·pren·tice

 (ə-prĕn′tĭs)
n.
1. One bound by legal agreement to work for another for a specific amount of time in return for instruction in a trade, art, or business.
2. One who is learning a trade or occupation, especially as a member of a labor union.
3. A beginner; a learner.
v. ap·pren·ticed, ap·pren·tic·ing, ap·pren·tic·es
v.intr.
To work as an apprentice: She apprenticed at the ceramics studio.
v.tr.
To engage as an apprentice: In colonial times many children were apprenticed to craftsmen.

[Middle English apprentis, from Old French aprentis, from Vulgar Latin *apprēnditīcius, from *apprēnditus, alteration of Latin apprehēnsus, past participle of apprehendere, to seize; see apprehend.]

ap·pren′tice·ship′ n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apprenticeship - the position of apprenticeapprenticeship - the position of apprentice    
berth, billet, post, situation, position, office, place, spot - a job in an organization; "he occupied a post in the treasury"

apprenticeship

noun traineeship, probation, studentship, novitiate or noviciate He served an apprenticeship as a tool-maker.
Translations
تَدَرُّب عَلى مِهْنَه
učňovství
læretidlærlingetid
tanulóidõ
lærlingsstaîa, læri
učňovstvo
çıraklık

apprenticeship

[əˈprentɪʃɪp] Naprendizaje m
to serve one's apprenticeshiphacer el aprendizaje

apprenticeship

[əˈprɛntɪsʃɪp] napprentissage m
to serve one's apprenticeship → faire son apprentissage
to serve one's apprenticeship as sth → faire son apprentissage de qch

apprenticeship

nLehre f, → Lehrzeit f; to serve one’s apprenticeshipseine Lehre or Lehrzeit absolvieren or machen

apprenticeship

[əˈprɛntɪsˌʃɪp] napprendistato, tirocinio
to serve one's apprenticeship → fare il proprio apprendistato or tirocinio

apprentice

(əˈprentis) noun
a (usually young) person who is learning a trade.
verb
to make (someone) an apprentice. His father apprenticed him to an engineer.
apˈprenticeship noun
the state of being, or the time during which a person is, an apprentice. He is serving his apprenticeship as a mechanic.
References in classic literature ?
Besides all, he had an overseer,--great, tall, slab-sided, two-fisted renegade son of Vermont--(begging your pardon),--who had gone through a regular apprenticeship in hardness and brutality and taken his degree to be admitted to practice.
He got no new clothing during his apprenticeship, but on his graduation day his master tricked him out in spang-new tow-linens and made him feel unspeakably rich and fine.
I missed it somehow in a bad apprenticeship, and now don't care about it.
Never has that curtain dropped so heavy and blank, as when my way in life lay stretched out straight before me through the newly-entered road of apprenticeship to Joe.
He talks of the higher quality of his work, as if the higher quality of it were of his own making--as if it gave him a right to work less for his neighbor than his neighbor works for him--as if the ploughman could not do better without him than he without the ploughman--as if the value of the most celebrated pictures has not been questioned more than that of any straight furrow in the arable world--as if it did not take an apprenticeship of as many years to train the hand and eye of a mason or blacksmith as of an artist--as if, in short, the fellow were a god, as canting brain worshippers have for years past been assuring him he is.
de Treville's hotel, "at least I have entered upon my apprenticeship, haven't I?
A gentleman of high birth, possessor of an ample fortune, you have consented to gain your promotion as an obscure soldier, step by step -- this is uncommon; then become general, peer of France, commander of the Legion of Honor, you consent to again commence a second apprenticeship, without any other hope or any other desire than that of one day becoming useful to your fellow-creatures; this, indeed, is praiseworthy, -- nay, more, it is sublime.
Do as you like," said Raoul, who was beginning his apprenticeship with that particular class of society, who, when there were robbers on the highroads, were connected with them, and who, since highwaymen no longer exist, have advantageously and aptly filled their vacant place.
An aristocrat need not be ashamed of the trade," observed Laurence; "for the Czar Peter the Great once served an apprenticeship to it.
David Faux, even before his apprenticeship was ended.
said the doctor, who had served an unholy apprenticeship to his trade in Tralee poorhouses.
Excuse me, my dear governor; but you speak a language which requires quite an apprenticeship to understand.