appropriacy

appropriacy

(əˈprəʊprɪəsɪ)
n
the condition of delicate and precise fittingness of a word or expression to its context, even when it is chosen from a number of close synonyms
References in periodicals archive ?
TBLT's focus on meaning making and learning communication appropriacy binds together language knowledge and cultural knowledge, placing the meaning of the language within its cultural context.
These can be discussed for grammatical fit, semantic appropriacy or match to devices of simile, metaphor or sound.
The cultivation approach, on the other hand, addresses issues of lexical development, appropriacy of linguistic registers for specialised functions, language education issues, the identification and easing of constraints impinging on language competence, and so on.
Consequently, the grammatical description presented in this article will allow us to "make statements about the appropriacy of certain linguistic choices given the context of their use" (Eggins 2004: 139).
Wu Xu, 5) Gender is more effective than race in determining appropriacy of the work type.
Norms appropriacy of achievement tests: Spanish-speaking children and English children's norms.
These norms are norms of appropriacy, culturally conditioned on a cline of 'writtenness' and 'spokenness'.
An example of an ineffective lesson plan is followed by a review of the six rules for grammar teaching; namely, the rules of Context, Use, Economy, Relevance, Nurture, and Appropriacy.
According to McCarthy (1991: 127), in face-to-face conversation there are specific linguistic devices used in turn-taking for framing transactions that vary greatly in level of formality and appropriacy to different situations (e.