appropriacy

appropriacy

(əˈprəʊprɪəsɪ)
n
the condition of delicate and precise fittingness of a word or expression to its context, even when it is chosen from a number of close synonyms
References in periodicals archive ?
Hymes' application (1971) of discourse analysis theories and cognitive psychology to the understanding of SLA highlighted that previous stances had failed to see two paramount aspects of this process, namely the social dimension of language use and the sociolinguistic norms of appropriacy that define different contexts.
For example, the current study does not examine test-takers' use of vocabulary in terms of meaning, appropriacy, derivation, form (including spelling), omission, or style.
A minority elected to study full-time in order to have the opportunity to be supported in developing their careers whilst preparing for the twin requirement of the PEAT: accuracy and appropriacy.
This gap between the knowledge and the skills identified in the policy and translated in the curriculum (examination and course contents) shows the lack of appropriacy pragmatic significance and productive utility of the syllabus.
As regards accuracy, several assessment criteria grids include it as "accuracy and appropriacy in language use" (PTE, iTEP, Trinity exams), others divide it into different discrete factors, including phonological control, tone and grammar and mechanics (iTEP); finally, some refer to accuracy under the heading of pronunciation (Cambridge exams, IELTS).
It is clear from the interview data that the students in the current study did not really understand that while formal writing tasks were geared toward the development of grammatical accuracy and structural appropriacy, the goal of the journaling and peer commenting activities was to encourage and develop written fluency.
These can be discussed for grammatical fit, semantic appropriacy or match to devices of simile, metaphor or sound.
Appropriacy, usage and fluency need to be stressed and the four skills reading, writing, listening and speaking, taught.
In my experience as an EFL learner and teacher, I have noticed that non-native EFL teachers, who have not been sufficiently exposed to the target language or who have not had enough time to assimilate it as used by native speakers in their everyday lives are constantly facing innumerable dilemmas especially in connection with the actual use and appropriacy of many target language structures.