apraxia


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Related to apraxia: dyspraxia, motor apraxia, Apraxia of Speech, childhood apraxia of speech

a·prax·i·a

 (ā-prăk′sē-ə)
n.
Total or partial loss of the ability to perform coordinated movements or manipulate objects in the absence of motor or sensory impairment.

[Greek aprāxiā, inaction : a-, without; see a-1 + prāxis, action; see praxis.]

a·prac′tic (ā-prăk′tĭk), a·prax′ic (ā-prăk′sĭk) adj.

apraxia

(əˈpræksɪə)
n
(Pathology) a disorder of the central nervous system caused by brain damage and characterized by impaired ability to carry out purposeful muscular movements
[C19: via New Latin from Greek: inactivity, from a-1 + praxis action]
aˈpraxic, aˈpractic adj

a•prax•i•a

(əˈpræk si ə, eɪˈpræk-)

n.
a nervous disorder characterized by an inability to perform purposeful movements but not with paralysis or a loss of feeling.
[1885–90; < German Apraxie < Greek aprāxía inaction; see a-6, praxis, -ia]
a•prac′tic (-tɪk) a•prax′ic, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apraxia - inability to make purposeful movementsapraxia - inability to make purposeful movements
brain disease, brain disorder, encephalopathy - any disorder or disease of the brain
Translations

a·prax·i·a

n. apraxia, falta de coordinación muscular en los movimientos causada por una afección cerebral.

apraxia

n apraxia
References in periodicals archive ?
But we also are seeking to use visual feedback to get at the underlying nature of apraxia and other related disorders, Katz said.
The Speak for Yourself application is being used by thousands of individuals around the world with autism, cerebral palsy, apraxia, and genetic syndromes.
Camden is homeschooled by his parents because he suffers from apraxia of speech.
For several years our work has been at the forefront of basic biological research in the area of DNA repair, and in particular we have made significant contributions to the understanding of inheritable diseases such as breast cancer, Fanconi anemia, and the neurodegenerative disorder Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia (AOA).
Ricochet is now helping 9-year-old West Chavez, who has been diagnosed with autism and a speech disorder known as childhood apraxia.
The clinician has to observe any signs of apraxia, ataxia, nystagmus or restricted eye movements.
Children attending Camp Chatterbox may have been born with or developed cerebral palsy, fallen ill with an infection, or suffered a stroke or other traumatic brain injury that causes childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), a condition that occurs when the brain is unable to direct the necessary movements for speaking.
When one considers linguistic disorders resulting from cerebellar lesions, there is a spectrum ranging from dysarthria and speech apraxia due to diminished motor coordination to impaired verbal fluency, problems in grammatic production, and, rarely, an aphasia syndrome triggered by a cerebellar pathology; the latter is much more complex and is closely associated with cognition (3).
Common features include ataxia, hypotonia, episodic hyperpnea, newborn apnea, developmental delay, oculomotor apraxia, nystagmus, dysmorphic facies and polydactyly.
The concept apraxia is more general and is frequently used without drawing a distinction between different severity levels of the disorder.
According to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, childhood apraxia of speech, or CAS, is a motor speech disorder.
Thus, the deformations of word contour, in particular, its syllabic content, can show the kinetic apraxia and interest of efferent cortical systems of brain.