apriorism


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apriorism

(eɪˈpraɪəˌrɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that there may be genuine knowledge independent of experience. Compare rationalism2, sensationalism3

apriorism

1. the method of a priori reasoning, i.e., deductive reasoning, from cause to effect or from the general to the particular.
2. an a priori principle.
See also: Logic
References in periodicals archive ?
And all these statements implied in the regression theorem are enounced apodictically as implied in the apriorism of praxeology.
In Defense of Extreme Apriorism," Southern Economic Journal 23, no 1: 314-320.
deepens his analysis of the Vorgriff as "an anticipatory sense that orients particular things apprehended by the human intellect toward their sustaining ground" (75) in the infinite mystery of God (in sharp contrast to Heidegger's apriorism of human finitude).
Apriorism, introspection, and the axiom of action: a realist solution.
Lincoln's propositional apriorism mirrors the German idealism imported into the United States in the first half of the 19th century (at times secondhand via France and England).
The problem with the evental realism of Badiou and Zizek is its relentless apriorism.
Another way of looking at the matter is to suggest that the general tradition we call retrospectively 'anthropological' embodies a number of antinomies logically inherent or historically embedded in the Western intellectual tradition: an ontological opposition between materialism and idealism, an epistemological opposition between empiricism and apriorism, a substantive opposition between the biological and the cultural, a methodological opposition between the nomothetic and the idiographic, an attitudinal opposition between the racialist and the egalitarian, an evaluational opposition between the progressivist and the primitivist--among others (1984: 4).
van Dun, Frank (2003), "Bayesianism and Austrian Apriorism," PhilPapers.
However, failing to discuss both contradictory historical descriptions of how experience as a concept has been used, and criticisms of Weber's classical study, (7) the argument seems to be, in the terms defined by Hutchinson, Read and Sharrock, tendentious and a case of apriorism "to be committed to something--a method or the relevant explanatory factors in one's explanation of social action--prior to ones investigation" (Hutchinson et al.
Herbener (Boston, MA: Dordrecht 1992); Ludwig von Mises, Theory and History: An Interpretation of Social and Economic Evolution (New Rochelle, NY: Arlington House, 1969); Thorsten Polleit, "Mises's Apriorism Against Relativism in Economics," accessed online at: http://blog.
If the relationship between the mainstream punitive apriorism and restorative justice is not understood unambiguously, the two cannot be compared adequately.