apriorist

apriorist

(ˌæprɪˈɔːrɪst)
n
a person who believes in apriorism
References in periodicals archive ?
Herder is presented as judging each epoch within its own context, denying that there could be any privileged position from which one could make claims about progress or history as a whole, while Fichte is presented as holding just such a grand apriorist narrative.
4) Claiming that his version of mathematical naturalism is a more sophisticated and comprehensive version of empiricism than the one usually associated with the name of John Stuart Mill, he maintains that only an overweening and misbegotten desire for an apriorist epistemology has induced modern philosophers of mathematics to reject empiricism as hopelessly simplistic and not a viable alternative to foundationalism.
Friedman broke with his Chicago mentors in undermining Knight's uncertainty-based defence of laissez-faire with his expected utility hypothesis and with his positivist program that eliminated (at least superficially) the apriorist and deductive logic foundation of the older rationalisation.
Hookway is careful to show that Peirce does not fall into an apriorist or transcendentalist metaphysical outlook.
He used it as an important basis, although of course not the only one, on which to build his apriorist interpretation of Galileo's work and the scientific revolution in general.
Here we have, succinctly stated, Koyre's apriorist, mathematicist, and Platonist account of the ship's mast experiment, of Galileo, and of the scientific revolution.
An apriorist (with regard to logic) will construe formal laws as a priori; a neutral person will leave their status (as a priori, a posteriori or neither) an open question.
61) Rahner here treats both Augustine and Aquinas as apriorists.
The majority of economic methodologists are apriorists, but there are exceptions.
The apriorists are those rationalist philosophers such as Descartes and Leibnitz who discovered the 'knowing subject' (Cogito ergo sum), and 'who believed that the general nature of the world could be established by wholly non-empirical demonstrative reasoning' (Bullock and Stallybrass 1981: 32).