Arabic


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Ar·a·bic

 (ăr′ə-bĭk)
n.
A Semitic language originating in the Arabian Peninsula that since the 7th century ad has come to be the principal language of a wide area of the Middle East and North Africa. Modern spoken Arabic consists of many different, often mutually unintelligible dialects, and a modified form of classical Arabic is used as the language of education and administration across the area.
adj.
Of or relating to Arabia, the Arabs, their language, or their culture.

Arabic

(ˈærəbɪk)
n
(Languages) the language of the Arabs, spoken in a variety of dialects; the official language of Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, the Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and Yemen. It is estimated to be the native language of some 75 million people throughout the world. It belongs to the Semitic subfamily of the Afro-Asiatic family of languages and has its own alphabet, which has been borrowed by certain other languages such as Urdu
adj
1. (Peoples) denoting or relating to this language, any of the peoples that speak it, or the countries in which it is spoken
2. (Languages) denoting or relating to this language, any of the peoples that speak it, or the countries in which it is spoken
3. (Placename) denoting or relating to this language, any of the peoples that speak it, or the countries in which it is spoken

Ar•a•bic

(ˈær ə bɪk)

n.
1. a Semitic language that in its classical form reflects the speech of Arabia at the time of Muhammad: now spoken in a variety of dialects over much of North Africa, the Sahara, and SW Asia. Abbr.: Ar
adj.
2. of or pertaining to Arabic.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arabic - the Semitic language of the ArabsArabic - the Semitic language of the Arabs; spoken in a variety of dialects
abaya - (Arabic) a loose black robe from head to toe; traditionally worn by Muslim women
mukataa - an Arabic word for headquarters or administrative center; "Arafat was holed up in the mukataa of his West Bank compound"
Semitic - a major branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family
bayat - an oath of allegiance to an emir
Mashriq - Arabic name for the Middle East
shaheed - Arabic term for holy martyrs; applied by Palestinians to suicide bombers
Adj.1.arabic - relating to or characteristic of ArabsArabic - relating to or characteristic of Arabs; "Arabic languages"
Translations
اللغة العربيةاللُغَة العَرَبِيَّةعَرَبِيّ
arabštinaarabskýarabský jazykarabská číslice
arabisk
araba
arabiaarabialainenarabi-
arapskiarapski jezikarebicaarabica
arabískaarabíska; arabískir tölustafir
アラビア語アラビア語の
아라비아 사람아라비아의
arabiški skaitmenys
arābu-arābu cipari
arabsko
arabiskarabiska
ที่เกี่ยวกับอาหรับภาษาหรืออักขระอาหรับ
ArapArapçarakamArap rakamları
thuộc nước/người/tiếng Arabtiếng Arab

Arabic

[ˈærəbɪk]
A. ADJárabe
B. N (Ling) → árabe m
C. CPD Arabic numerals NPLnumeración fsing arábiga

Arabic

[ˈærəbɪk]
adj [script, literature, music] → arabe
narabe mArabic numerals nplchiffres mpl arabes

Arabic

nArabisch nt
adjarabisch; Arabic numeralsarabische Ziffern or Zahlen; Arabic studiesArabistik f

Arabic

[ˈærəbɪk]
1. n (language) → arabo
2. adjarabo/a, arabico/a

Arabic

(ˈӕrəbik) : Arabic numerals
1,2 etc, as opposed to Roman numerals, I,II etc.

arabic

اللغة العربية, عَرَبِيّ arabský, arabština arabisk arabisch αραβικά, αραβικός árabe, arábigo arabi-, arabia arabe arapski arabo アラビア語, アラビア語の 아라비아 사람, 아라비아의 Arabisch araber, arabisk arabski, język arabski árabe арабский, арабский язык arabisk, arabiska ที่เกี่ยวกับอาหรับ, ภาษาหรืออักขระอาหรับ Arap, Arapça thuộc nước/người/tiếng Arab, tiếng Arab 阿拉伯的, 阿拉伯语
Arabic   
References in classic literature ?
Why, hang it, you won't get along in Geneva--THEY don't speak Arabic, they speak French.
An American sailor, who was cast away on the shore of Africa, where he was kept in slavery for three years, was, at the expiration of that period, found to be imbruted and stultified--he had lost all reasoning power; and having forgotten his native language, could only ut- ter some savage gibberish between Arabic and Eng- lish, which nobody could understand, and which even he himself found difficulty in pronouncing.
By the crook of St Dunstan,'' said that worthy ecclesiastic, ``which hath brought more sheep within the sheepfold than the crook of e'er another saint in Paradise, I swear that I cannot expound unto you this jargon, which, whether it be French or Arabic, is beyond my guess.
But what I liked best of all was writing Arabic characters, and in this I soon surpassed my masters, and gained a reputation in this branch of knowledge that reached as far as India itself.
One day, as I was in the Alcana of Toledo, a boy came up to sell some pamphlets and old papers to a silk mercer, and, as I am fond of reading even the very scraps of paper in the streets, led by this natural bent of mine I took up one of the pamphlets the boy had for sale, and saw that it was in characters which I recognised as Arabic, and as I was unable to read them though I could recognise them, I looked about to see if there were any Spanish-speaking Morisco at hand to read them for me; nor was there any great difficulty in finding such an interpreter, for even had I sought one for an older and better language I should have found him.
When he regains his senses he will kill me," she said, in Arabic.
Always the same impassible member of the Reform Club, whom no incident could surprise, as unvarying as the ship's chronometers, and seldom having the curiosity even to go upon the deck, he passed through the memorable scenes of the Red Sea with cold indifference; did not care to recognise the historic towns and villages which, along its borders, raised their picturesque outlines against the sky; and betrayed no fear of the dangers of the Arabic Gulf, which the old historians always spoke of with horror, and upon which the ancient navigators never ventured without propitiating the gods by ample sacrifices.
Without having been in the school of the Abbe Faria, the worthy master of The Young Amelia (the name of the Genoese tartan) knew a smattering of all the tongues spoken on the shores of that large lake called the Mediterranean, from the Arabic to the Provencal, and this, while it spared him interpreters, persons always troublesome and frequently indiscreet, gave him great facilities of communication, either with the vessels he met at sea, with the small boats sailing along the coast, or with the people without name, country, or occupation, who are always seen on the quays of seaports, and who live by hidden and mysterious means which we must suppose to be a direct gift of providence, as they have no visible means of support.
It sounds a little strangely, here in the Valley of Lebanon, but it has the merit of being easier to remember than the Arabic name.
In its centre is the district of Unyanembe--a delicious region, where some families of Omani, who are of very pure Arabic origin, live in luxurious idleness.
Air, that medium of sound, was wanting to transmit the groanings of that moon which the Arabic legends call "a man already half granite, and still breathing.
The Persian, Arabic, and Sanscrit languages engaged his attention, and I was easily induced to enter on the same studies.