arachnid


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a·rach·nid

 (ə-răk′nĭd)
n.
Any of various arthropods of the class Arachnida, such as spiders, scorpions, mites, and ticks, characterized by four pairs of segmented legs and a body that is divided into two regions, the cephalothorax and the abdomen.

[From New Latin Arachnida, class name, from Greek arakhnē, spider.]

a·rach′ni·dan (-nĭ-dən) adj. & n.

arachnid

(əˈræknɪd)
n
(Zoology) any terrestrial chelicerate arthropod of the class Arachnida, characterized by simple eyes and four pairs of legs. The group includes the spiders, scorpions, ticks, mites, and harvestmen
[C19: from New Latin Arachnida, from Greek arakhnē spider]
aˈrachnidan adj, n

a•rach•nid

(əˈræk nɪd)

n.
any of numerous wingless, carnivorous arthropods of the class Arachnida, comprising spiders, scorpions, mites, and ticks, characterized by a two-segmented body with eight appendages and no antennae.
[1865–70; < New Latin Arachnida < Greek aráchn(ē) spider, spider's web + New Latin -ida -ida]
a•rach′ni•dan, adj., n.

a·rach·nid

(ə-răk′nĭd)
Any of a group of arthropods having eight segmented legs, no wings or antennae, and a body divided into two parts. One part consists of the head and thorax joined together, and the other part is the abdomen. Spiders, mites, scorpions, and ticks are arachnids.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arachnid - air-breathing arthropods characterized by simple eyes and four pairs of legsarachnid - air-breathing arthropods characterized by simple eyes and four pairs of legs
arthropod - invertebrate having jointed limbs and a segmented body with an exoskeleton made of chitin
Arachnida, class Arachnida - a large class of arthropods including spiders and ticks and scorpions and daddy longlegs; have four pairs of walking legs and no wings
harvestman, Phalangium opilio, daddy longlegs - spiderlike arachnid with a small rounded body and very long thin legs
scorpion - arachnid of warm dry regions having a long segmented tail ending in a venomous stinger
false scorpion, pseudoscorpion - small nonvenomous arachnid resembling a tailless scorpion
whip scorpion, whip-scorpion - nonvenomous arachnid that resembles a scorpion and that has a long thin tail without a stinger
spider - predatory arachnid with eight legs, two poison fangs, two feelers, and usually two silk-spinning organs at the back end of the body; they spin silk to make cocoons for eggs or traps for prey
acarine - mite or tick

arachnid

Translations

arachnid

[əˈræknɪd] Narácnido m

arachnid

nSpinnentier nt
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