araucarian

araucarian

(ˌærɔːˈkɛərɪən)
adj
related to or belonging to the genus Araucaria
References in classic literature ?
Robert Brown has been kind enough to examine the wood: he says it belongs to the fir tribe, partaking of the character of the Araucarian family, but with some curious points of affinity with the yew.
Araucarian conifers were globally widespread during the Mesozoic, reaching their peak in the Northern Hemisphere in Cretaceous times (Enright and Hill 1995).
The absence of true growth rings in the araucarian wood implies growth under a humid subtropical climate characterized by high year-round temperatures (Creber 1977).
Applying the biomechanical relationship, determined by Niklas (1994), between trunk diameter and height, the slender araucarian trunk would have supported a tree at least 8 m high.
Thus the divergence of this lineage from Cycadocarpidium, from early araucarian conifers, or from a common ancestor with either of these two groups is consistent with their respective geologic ages.
Primaraucaria, a new araucarian genus from the Virginia Triassic.
Forest litter preserved in the mudstone contains numerous angiosperm leaves, fragmentary fern fronds, wood and probable araucarian bark (Fig.
The rainforest, Araucarian microphyll vine forest (Webb 1959), is dominated by Flindersia australis (R.
The genus Centris (Apidae: Centridini) contains about 144 species of bees which are Neotropical in distribution, except for few species ranging into the Neartic and Araucarian regions (Michener 2000).
from araucarian rainforest to schlerophyllous woodland coincided with a marked rise in particulate charcoal, which continued in quantity to the top of the core.