arbitrable


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ar·bi·tra·ble

 (är′bĭ-trə-bəl)
adj.
1. Subject to arbitration: an arbitrable wage and health benefits policy.
2. Appropriate for referral to an arbitrator: an arbitrable dispute.

ar•bi•tra•ble

(ˈɑr bɪ trə bəl)

adj.
capable of arbitration; subject to the decision of an arbiter or arbitrator: an arbitrable dispute.
[1525–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.arbitrable - appropriate for or subject to settlement by arbitrationarbitrable - appropriate for or subject to settlement by arbitration; "an arbitrable wage and health benefits policy"; "an arbitrable dispute"
nonarbitrable - not appropriate for or subject to arbitration
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References in periodicals archive ?
Under the Supreme Court's jurisprudence, "`any doubts concerning the scope of arbitrable issues should be resolved in favor of arbitration, whether the problem at hand is the construction of the contract language itself or an allegation of waiver, delay or a like defense to arbitrability.
171) If the Court found the claims arbitrable, the decision would preclude adjudication as required by the Securities Act.
Specifically, the Liverpool Court ruled that arbitration agreements, concededly vitalized by the Taylor Law, would no longer be favored with the presumption that a claimed dispute under a collective bargaining agreement is arbitrable unless the "dispute falls clearly and unequivocally within the class of claims agreed to be referred to arbitration.
Motors, which held federal antitrust laws to be arbitrable by
The parties may agree to submit to arbitration to settle any potential dispute between them arising from their legal relationship as long as the dispute is arbitrable in a number of ways.
Nor is there evidence that anyone at the time believed the FAA made statutory claims arbitrable.
One way that a party can impliedly waive its right to arbitrate is by engaging in litigation with respect to issues that are otherwise arbitrable.
28) For example, employment, intellectual property, and family-law disputes historically have not been arbitrable in some countries.
ROLPH & PATRICIA EBENER, PRIVATE DISPUTE RESOLUTION IN THE BANKING INDUSTRY 22-23 (1993) (reporting the results of a study by the RAND Institute for Civil Justice that found that "new arbitrable litigation decreased markedly after the introduction off arbitration requirements).
Age Discrimination in Employment Act are arbitrable, unless Congress